And seriously, FYI you guys

April 5th, 2010 · 96 comments

This note was spotted by Sara at the downtown Alamo Cinema Drafthouse in Austin, seemingly written by an employee channeling Amy Poehler’s character in Wet Hot American Summer.

Hey guys, listen up! There is [sic] way too many memos being posted around here lately, irregardless of what they may say. Let's all do our part to minimize clutter on the wall. Seriously, no biggie, just you know...

Seriously guys, amirite?!?

related: Now finish up them taters, I’m gonna go fondle my sweaters

FILED UNDER: Austin · CAPS LOCK · fed-up librarian · irregardless · meta · now that's management · spelling and grammar police


96 responses so far ↓

  • #1   infanttyrone

    Irrespective of the redundant and misleading promotion of the perfectly useful and understandable ‘regardless’ to the mystifying ‘irregardless’ and regardless of the number mismatch between the verb ‘is’ and the predicate nominative ‘memos’, this writer does wrestle the main point to the ironic ground with vigor but then tries to furtive his ass away unnoticed with a cowardly cloud of current idiom that would have been better off replaced by a simple ‘Just saying’.

    Dude, can’t anyone get through to you about keeping it short and simple ?

    Apr 5, 2010 at 12:37 am   rating: 68  small thumbs up

    • #1.1   hello lamppost

      I get whawere going for, but “furtive” is an adjective, not a verb.

      Just saying.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 5:55 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.2   hello lamppost

      …and apparently a chunk of text mysteriously disappeared where it was meant to say “what you were”. Alas. Failure all around.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 5:56 am   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.3   infanttyrone

      Well, I considered skulk, slink, and slither, but none felt as robust as “furtive his ass away”, so “Sgt. Furtive” got a battlefield promotion.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 3:30 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.4   park rose bang

      At 1.3, which just goes to show, it pays to be anal retentive.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 1:11 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.5   Terwilliger

      Bazinga. The brilliant brains of people who play MMORPGs and for whom complete social awkwardness impedes… damn near everything. Send this man a bottle of tan-in-a-can so he doesn’t frighten the natives… or blind them… when he goes out on his weekly 2 am Wal-Mart run for more Hot Pockets and Red Bull.

      Apr 9, 2010 at 6:28 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.6   ISpy

      Truly brilliant in so many ways, Ty. I’m just now catching up on PAN after a couple of weeks away. Did 1.0 make it to “Word!”? (I’m open to any suggestions on how to punctuate that last sentence.)

      Apr 12, 2010 at 9:13 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #2   aaa bang

    Is it just me, or do people who use “irregardless” always seem like they’re missing half their brain?

    Apr 5, 2010 at 1:39 am   rating: 41  small thumbs up

    • #2.1   chrisswiss83 bang

      I can’t mentally check out of a conversation with someone who says “irregardless” fast enough.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 4:23 am   rating: 21  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.2   Boomshine

      Nope, definitely not just you. I feel the same way. I can’t believe how prevalent “irregardless” is in our lives still. I just about smack people across the face whenever they say it. Ignorant idiocy like that spins me off into a whole new zone of pissed off.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 5:41 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.3   Woman on the Verge bang

      It’s right up there with “I could care less”. If you could care less, then it isn’t so bad, right?

      Apr 5, 2010 at 8:00 am   rating: 23  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.4   AuntyBron

      My mama used “irregardless” and she was pretty darn smart.

      Smart enough to train 8 small childress to follow her in a grocery store without running, yelling or grabbing stuff off the shelves.

      Smart enough to train toddlers to respond to hand signals when they were misbehaving.

      So neener, neener.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:38 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.5   aaa bang

      Did you just neener neener a stranger on the internet who cares so little about (general) your existence or their own argument that they deliberately contradict themselves multiple times within a post and think it appropriate to converse in haiku? Now that’s just damn funny.

      (Unless you’re being facetious. I can’t always tell over the internet, and well, you know, this is PAN after all…)

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:51 am   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.6   shwonline bang

      @chrisswiss83: What if the person doesn’t say “irregardless” fast enough? Can you mentally check out of the conversation then?

      I can’t mentally check out of a thread fast enough with someone who puts modifiers in the most ambiguous place possible and then criticizes someone else’s grammar.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:48 am   rating: 15  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.7   Woman on the Verge bang

      AuntyBron, sorry to hear about your childhood. It must have been difficult growing up with the fear of being beaten with illogical grammar and “hand signals” (the slashing hand across the throat is always a good one) if you misbehaved.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:56 am   rating: 18  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.8   ISUCK

      HA, what about black people?

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:07 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.9   Canthz_B bang

      What about us?

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:19 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.10   Sparkles23 bang

      When I hear/read “irregardless” I have a sudden urge to watch the Sopranos.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:07 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.11   AuntyBron

      Well, thanks for the commisseration I’m pretty sure I butchered the spelling), WoV but my childhood was not bad. Except for the assembly-line spankings, I mean.

      The toddlers in question were actually my nieces and nephews and the hand signals were more like: clap of the hands to get their attention; point at her feet meaning they had to plop their bottoms next to her until she told them she could move. Oddly enough hands at the throat were not involved.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:51 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.12   chrisswiss83 bang

      @shwonlin

      Oh man, you sure showed up the ambiguity of my sentence structure in a comment that was purely about the use of a non-word. Clearly I shouldn’t go around having opinions on words no one should say while someone could easily point out that a sentence I wrote deliberately in an impactful manner is grammatically unsound. OMG I JUST REALIZED IT IS I WHO IS THE PHONY!

      Apr 6, 2010 at 2:02 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.13   infanttyrone

      chrisswiss83,
      I think your original structure was quite sound.
      But then I am used to living with ambiguity.

      I took it one way to mean that you couldn’t check out of a conversation fast enough if someone used “irregardless”. Probably what you meant.

      But the other way meant that you would be held in a conversational tractor beam if someone quickly enough used “irregardless”.
      It conjures up an image of someone stalwartly enduring bad vocabulary on the chance that they might encounter some new twisted verbal jewelry in the other person’s half of the dialogue.

      Many have gained riches by enduring less…you probably only meant the first one, but thanks from me for both of them.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 2:36 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #2.14   ammali

      I like to confuse them by interpreting their sentence literally–”irregardless” — the prefix and suffix creates a double negative, so I treat it as though they said it in a positive manner.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 6:47 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #3   ArfArf

    The grammarian inside my head just shot herself.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 1:50 am   rating: 30  small thumbs up

    • #3.1   ArfArf

      Strunk and White say “Omit needless words.” I’m not sure anything would be left of this memo if we followed that advice.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 2:12 am   rating: 13  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.2   Boomshine

      “Stop posting shit on the walls.” <- Fixt.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 5:43 am   rating: 16  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.3   aaa bang

      Your inner grammarian’s a woman? Mine’s pretty androgynous, so I can’t tell what he/she/it is.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:48 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.4   Oriana

      Like the people who say ‘utilize’ when they just mean ‘use.’ Same types liked to skip lines to make their essays look longer in grammar school!

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:49 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.5   Pterosaur

      I think your inner grammarian formed a murder-suicide pact with mine about halfway through this note. It would explain the shooting pain in my skull.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:04 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.6   Mo® bang

      My inner grammarian looks like Ziggy Stardust Bowie so I am not sure what they are…

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:08 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.7   Woman on the Verge bang

      My inner grammarian is ogling Mo®’s so…

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:14 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.8   park rose bang

      Like spiders from Mars, perhaps, Mor ?

      And I shall utilise utilise furtively in situations where use would have done. But, come on, pull out your thesaurus, how many synonyms are there for use that can be easily used/utilised?

      Last furtive online check,

      accept, adopt, apply, avail oneself of, bestow, bring into play, bring to bear, capitalize, control, do with, draw on, employ, exercise, exert, exhaust, expend, exploit, find a use, govern, handle, make do with, make the most of, make use, manage, manipulate, operate, play on, ply, practice, press into service, put forth, put into action, put to use, put to work, regulate, relate, run, run through, set in motion, spend, take advantage of*, turn to account, utilize, waste, wield, work

      I utilise utilise with gay abandon. No wonder it always accuses me of using it.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 7:51 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.9   infanttyrone

      rose,
      This time zone suits you, m’deah.
      I imploringly impose on you to rescue me from the flaming-torch-toting villagers cranky about the verb-spell I cast upon ‘furtive’.
      I was only trying to breathe new life into the poor adjective…help him to branch out beyond the shadows of stealthy adjectival secretiveness.
      I did not realize I had created a monster.
      I would recall him to the lab, but language being such a fluid medium, I fear he will not come back to me and give up his new-found action status.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:42 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.10   FeRD

      dict is even more effusive, producing

      From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 [moby-thes]:
      204 Moby Thesaurus words for “use”:
      ablation, absolute interest, abuse, account, act toward, adaptability, advantage, appliance, applicability, application, apply, appropriateness, automatism, avail, availability, bad habit, behalf, behave toward, behoof, benefit, bestow, bleed, bleed white, bon ton, bring into play, care for, carry on, ceremony, characteristic, claim, common, conduct, conformity, consuetude, contend with, contingent interest, control, convenience, convention, cope with, creature of habit, custom, deal by, deal with, demand, do, do by, do with, drain, duty, easement, effectiveness, efficacy, efficiency, employ, employment, end use, engage in, equitable interest, equity, erosion, established way, estate, etiquette, exercise, exercising, exert, exertion, exploit, fall back, familiarize, fashion, fitness, folkway, follow, force of habit, formality, function, functionality, go in for, goal, govern, habit, habit pattern, habituate, habitude, handle, helpfulness, holding, ill-use, immediate purpose, impose, impose upon, interest, inure, limitation, make use of, manage, manipulate, manner, manners, mark, milk, misuse, mores, object, objective, observance, occasion, office, operability, operate, operation, operational purpose, parley, part, pattern, peculiarity, percentage, play, play on, ply, point, practicability, practical utility, practicality, practice, praxis, prescription, presume upon, profit, profitability, proper thing, prosecute, purpose, pursue, put forth, put out, put to use, ravages of time, regulate, relevance, respond to, right, right of entry, ritual, role, run, second nature, serve, service, serviceability, settlement, social convention, specialize in, stake, standard behavior, standard usage, standing custom, stereotype, stereotyped behavior, steward, strict settlement, stroke, suck dry, tackle, take, take advantage of, take on, take to, take up, talk, target, time-honored practice, title, tradition, treat, trick, trust, ultimate purpose, undertake, usability, usage, use ill, usefulness, utility, utilizability, utilize, value, vested interest, wage, way, wear, wear and tear, weathering, what is done, wield, wont, wonting, work, work at, work on, work upon, worth

      Apr 6, 2010 at 6:43 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #3.11   ArfArf

      @aaa. My inner grammarian is most definitely female. She resembles my freshman history teacher whose ghost I still feel breathing down my neck whenever I split an infinitive or construct a passive phrase. Ironically, she would call it “feminine voice.” I never knew grammar could be sexist. Who knew?

      Apr 6, 2010 at 8:39 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #4   Canthz_B bang

    Now that are a damned shame!

    Pacifically the “irregardless”.

    I have no ideal what they is getting at.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 2:06 am   rating: 35  small thumbs up

    • #4.1   H for Toy bang

      O, pacifically! I haven’t heard that in a long time. I might could start using it on a regular base.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:51 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.2   farcical aquatic ceremony

      Make sure to throw in “supposably” a bunch, too. I hear this bastardization at least 5 times per day from two otherwise blameless souls in my office…I try to just keep reminding myself that they’re good people, etc., etc., but I still may snap.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 1:57 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.3   Sue Do Nim bang

      Don’t take it for granite that everyone knows how to speak good.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 2:25 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.4   Mo® bang

      The just of their message is good.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 3:02 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.5   Flaboy2425

      It done went ovah ma haid also too. But mos’ thin’s does. Larn ta rite Anglush, Busta.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 4:03 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.6   aaa bang

      BESCUZE ME?!?!?! You DID NOT just mock pacifically! I have used that countless times in scientifical papers all the damn time and it has never held me back!

      Apr 5, 2010 at 4:08 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.7   MAMARILLA2 bang

      I now have a strong craving for a siezure salad.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 5:11 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.8   park rose bang

      It’s the cretins that really give it its flavour.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 7:53 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.9   Canthz_B bang

      That seizure salad would go well with Scrimp Parm over Bisghetti.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:26 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.10   infanttyrone

      True story…
      Sam Wo’s restaurant in SF’s Chinatown area.
      Friends had told me of a surly waiter there and correctly predicted certain behaviors.
      Supposedly the son of a Chinese warlord who idolized Henry Ford (?), the waiter’s name was Edsel Ford Fong.
      Walk up to the third floor, sit down, and here comes Edsel with a stack of menus, a pencil and a small piece of blank paper.
      Edsel’s line as he tossed this collection on the table:
      “Read the menu,
      put down what you want on the paper,
      you don’t see it..don’t put it down,
      Be Pacific!”

      OK, so they knew his routine…but, Edsel Ford Fong ??

      Cut to 3 years later at a garage sale in (Hi, PG) Austin, pick up a book about interesting things to do in the Bay Area….and up from page 53 comes the name and story of Edsel Ford Fong, with his brusqueness and signature line exactly as I experienced it.

      Now back to Grammar Quibbles with Leonard Pinth Garnell.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:05 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.11   infanttyrone

      rose,
      Don’t let Greenpeace catch you spilling any of those crude tonnes.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:08 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.12   Canthz_B bang

      OK, who else cringes when someone refers to their Drivers License (the card which proves they have permission to legally operate a motor vehicle) as “them”?

      Apr 6, 2010 at 12:11 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.13   infanttyrone

      CB,
      Any geographical coordinates (or website info) you can supply to help us all avoid these sorts of grammatically licentious and syntactically barbaric louts who have governmental sanction to operate high velocity, high mass vehicles will be greatly appreciated, I’m sure.
      Until then, I’m thinking the bus or even hitching with semis.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 12:57 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.14   Canthz_B bang

      Don’t they need hitchhiking licentiouses for that?

      You know, they take a test to show they know the best syntactics to use to get a tractor-trailer to pick them up.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 1:08 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.15   infanttyrone

      I’m of the Sissy Hankshaw outlaw school of hitching.
      No tests, no papers, no badges…just supernaturally-sized thumbs.
      Hmmm, Sissy Hankshaw, that’d be a pretty good handle for
      a generously amused reader here.
      If I meet that Buddha on this road, I’ll buy her a bus, or give her a buss.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 1:28 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.16   Canthz_B bang

      You might find her on the road less traveled, unless you’re into wide-loads.
      I say keep on truckin’! :-)

      Apr 6, 2010 at 1:34 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.17   Mike

      It could of been a grate note, if only he would of used a better font.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 9:43 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.18   BingoPajama

      I am so siked that there is other peeple out there that totaly get it.
      Now someone gets these bees outta my hare.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 4:07 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #5   Gunderson

    I didn’t know that I had to use my ears while I read a memo that’s anti-memo.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 6:54 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

    • #5.1   park rose bang

      Waxing lyrical – when you use your ears to write a memo that’s anti-memo.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:54 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #5.2   infanttyrone

      Y’all might best keep a sharp lookout for what yer eyes are doin’ while y’all’s ears are doin’ alla this readin’ and writin’…oh, wait, you’d need…
      Derek Jacobi in “I, Praetorius”

      Apr 6, 2010 at 1:07 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #6   Chris

    This note looks ‘shopped to me.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 7:05 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

    • #6.1   anglophile bang

      I kind of see what you’re saying there, Chris. Would anyone really set the font that high and print it out?

      But then I think of all the idiots I’ve seen in the world, as well as all the pranksters, and I think, yeah, someone out there probably would.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 8:04 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.2   AbleApril

      Agreed. I’ve seen quite a few in my time and you can tell by looking at the pixels… ;-)

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:05 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.3   Rahm

      Maybe it’s how the text looks perfectly flat while the paper appears to curl a bit towards the bottom. It’s slight, but the text also appears extra-bright and well-defined. I wouldn’t be surprised if forensic investigation proved it to be A BIG PHONY.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:13 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.4   TheOldSchool

      Since this note originates out of Texas, I was somewhat skeptical of its legitimacy.

      I ran a few tests.

      Skipped some.

      Hop-scotched others.

      When I complete the “mincing” phase, I’ll be able to bring this to a head.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:43 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #7   sunny_me

    I… Can’t… There are no words. I especially like the part, “seriously, no biggie, just you know.” Stream of consciousness blather makes my day.

    If I knew this person I’d smother them in their sleep.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 7:54 am   rating: 14  small thumbs up

     
  • #8   Mo® bang

    When I hear the word “irregardless” I reach for my pistol.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 9:35 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

    • #8.1   H for Toy bang

      How about incidences?

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:40 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.2   Mo® bang

      The coincidence of two figures? :grin:

      Apr 5, 2010 at 1:19 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.3   H for Toy bang

      :) I believe it’s one incident, two incidents and three incidences. After that, you’re fired.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 2:08 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.4   TippingCows

      How about “basically”? The sound of that word makes me want to kick kittens.
      People also like to use “in fact”, “theoretically”, and “technically” too much. I will boil their bottoms.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 4:09 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #9   Frimmy

    “I can’t mentally check out of a conversation with someone who says “irregardless” fast enough”

    Well said.

    “Smart enough to train 8 children…”
    That takes the ability to instill fear and/or unquestioning obedience, not necessarily intelligence, and not necessarily a bad thing.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 10:10 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

    • #9.1   Rahm

      …not as well said as it could have been; see shwonline for bonus grammar points.

      Also:
      “My mama used “irregardless” and she was pretty darn smart.”
      Based on just this information, No, she wasn’t.

      (I’m doing my best to bite my tongue on the subject of how 8 small “childress” indicates an ignorance of how to properly use birth control, or perhaps an adherence to some “go forth and multiply” dogma, both of which also contradict the assessment of “pretty darn smart” in my opinion. Oops, Looks like I failed to keep that one to myself. Darn.)

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:21 pm   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.2   ISpy

      Actual quote after school today from a dad: “Yeah, I went to private school for kindiegarden and first grade. They was teaching me mulplication first thing, so when I got to secunt, I done had all that math afore. Things is differnt now.” Right you are, sir…

      Apr 12, 2010 at 9:24 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #10   Escape Goat

    JUST YOU KNOW …

    Ignore you? Deal.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 10:44 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

     
  • #11   Jin East bang

    Something about this screams fake, I just can’t quite place my finger on it. Either this person lacks any semblance of rational thought or they deliberately tried to appear that way and by all accounts, succeeded. Regardless, I still have to wonder why.

    Also, it seems that ‘irregardless’ has breached the common English vernacular because my spell check has failed to underline the word with its normal red enthusiasm.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 11:58 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

    • #11.1   Mo® bang

      Usage Note: Irregardless is a word that many mistakenly believe to be correct usage in formal style, when in fact it is used chiefly in nonstandard speech or casual writing. Coined in the United States in the early 20th century, it has met with a blizzard of condemnation for being an improper yoking of irrespective and regardless and for the logical absurdity of combining the negative ir- prefix and -less suffix in a single term. Although one might reasonably argue that it is no different from words with redundant affixes like debone and unravel, it has been considered a blunder for decades and will probably continue to be so.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 1:22 pm   rating: 7  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.2   Woman on the Verge bang

      Thank you so much, Professor Mo. We will now return to our regularly scheduled comments.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 1:33 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.3   Gladystopia

      “Coined in the United States in the early 20th century, it has met with a blizzard of condemnation…”

      Also asswhuppings, glares of death, and the occasional Killing From Above With Fire.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 3:44 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.4   Canthz_B bang

      Irregardless of what spellchecker says, “without regarding without regard to” is just dumb.
      I will concede that it’s nonstandard speech inasmuch as it’s a sign of ignorance to use it.

      I’d like to bone and unravel the user each time I hear it.

      *bone* :-P

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:43 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #12   ISUCK

    Apparently everyone has recently learned that they should be offended by the word irregardless. WELL DONE INTERNET.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 12:11 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

    • #12.1   AiyeSuk

      Apearently evreywon haz recuntlee lurned thayt theiy shood bee uffendead bai thuh werd eerieguardles.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 2:55 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #12.2   aaa bang

      Hey you old motherfucking so and so! We missed you!

      Apr 5, 2010 at 4:11 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #13   Fuschia Grown

    Wow. Possible authors of this note:

    a) a guerrilla flarf poet
    b) an idiot whose inner grammarian departed for smarter brain-pastures
    c) a ‘shopper

    Thoughts?

    Apr 5, 2010 at 12:45 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

    • #13.1   TheOldSchool

      Yes.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:50 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #14   Elmo

    IRREGARDLESS? I thought that only fum ducks from Pennsyltucky talked like that!

    Apr 5, 2010 at 2:25 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

    • #14.1   H for Toy bang

      Hell no! We here in Pennsyltucky use “disirregardless”. We’re all about the triple negatives.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 3:14 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #14.2   aaa bang

      Don’t you not never talk no **BLEEP** books under this roof! Not now, not never ever no hell no!! Listen here, readin’s don’t not never not done nothin for not nobody!!! … Excuse me, not NONEbody, never not no one didn’t about no reason not never and by god they NEVER NOT AIN’T GONNA WILL!!!!!

      Apr 5, 2010 at 4:12 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #14.3   Limeliberator bang

      I’m from “Pennsyltucky” and I wouldn’t dream of insulting the intelligence of my office mates with such callous disdain for the English language. I’m just VERY thankful that the writer didn’t give the word “memos” an apostrophe. The improper use of the apostrophe makes me want to gouge my eyes out with a pencil. I can discount some things but that’s not something that I can overlook.

      “I am the grammarian about whom your mother warned you.”

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:55 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #14.4   park rose bang

      Umm, that’s a bit of a leaden comment, wouldn’t you say, Ll? And, I’d like a discount on starting sentences with a conjunction, please. After that, there are a few high end watches I’ve got my eye on. Be a love for me and knock a few hundred or more off the high end price for me, would you, duckie? A 75% markdown should suffice. Cheers!

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:01 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #14.5   infanttyrone

      Don’t get carried away with the graphite-y.
      Keep yer ice on the price.*

      *Apologeez to any MLK devotays out there.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 2:44 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #15   Hierophantria

    My inner grammar and language nazi is crying. Just because it has become common vernacular doesn’t make it correct. If anything, I am more suspicious of words with such origins.

    Apr 5, 2010 at 5:04 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

    • #15.1   Canthz_B bang

      Words like “gigglebrax”?

      Apr 5, 2010 at 9:44 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #15.2   Sparkles23 bang

      and “douchecanoe”?

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:11 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #15.3   TheOldSchool

      and “gigglecanoe”?

      Apr 6, 2010 at 12:02 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #15.4   infanttyrone

      Well, “douchebrax” makes four, no ?
      If we’re playing bridge then four no usually has a special meaning.
      Maybe tennis be mo’ betta.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 1:17 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #16   Jean

    “irregardless”? Seriously? Contradictions all around!

    Apr 6, 2010 at 9:03 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

     
  • #17   Lameo

    This note looks blatantly ‘shopped.

    Apr 7, 2010 at 1:54 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

     
  • #18   Euphonicin

    Ahhhh . . . Edsel Ford Wong . . . we used to get the tomato-beef chowmein (delicious) and a lot of verbal abuse on our improper eating techniques.

    Apr 10, 2010 at 3:36 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

     
  • #19   Elliot

    I agree with Gin (11), I think it’s something to do with the text.

    Apr 12, 2010 at 12:59 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

     

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