Scat, fat cat!

October 26th, 2011 · 241 comments

Sometimes it takes a village to raise an obese cat.

Sam spotted this somewhat presumptuous notice while house-hunting in South London. “We looked everywhere for the monster cat,” he says, to no avail. (Perhaps if you’d tried slipping a few opened tins of tuna fish in your pockets?)

PLEASE STOP FEEDING MY CAT! Over the last 4 months he has put on 7 lbs! He is now seriously overweight! This is BAD for his health. He is on a special diet prescribed by the VET. If he tries to steal your cats' food: CHASE HIM OFF! Please stop feeding him voluntarily. Thank You.

related: To whom that wanted to be a superhero and take my cat to the pound

FILED UNDER: cats · food · neighbors


241 responses so far ↓

  • #1   Amber

    Dear cat owner: stop letting your cat roam around outside, and your problem will be solved. It’s not the neighborhood’s job to police Fatty’s behavior.

    Oct 26, 2011 at 11:28 pm   rating: 246  small thumbs up

    • #1.1   shesajem

      If its an outside cat it won’t stay inside I can assure you.

      Oct 26, 2011 at 11:52 pm   rating: 45  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.2   Jen

      What Amber is saying is that if you choose to let your cat be an outside cat (which is against the law, not that anyone cares), you can’t expect your neighbor’s to be concerned with what he’s eating. She actually asks people not to let HER cat eat other people’s cats’ food. That’s absurd. You are responsible for your pet, no one else.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 12:05 am   rating: 120  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.3   Serenity

      Where is it illegal to let a cat outside? I know it’s frowned upon by a lot of people, and I myself keep mine inside, because I don’t think a city is a good place to let a cat roam. But in London is it actually illegal? Just curious :)

      Oct 27, 2011 at 12:53 am   rating: 23  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.4   jadefirefly

      I actually went and googled this, and I couldn’t find any major laws which dictated it. I did find references to some US state laws which hinted that it may be illegal to allow your cat to roam freely “away from the owners property” – and really, how are you going to keep a cat on your side of the lawn? :P

      When I visited the UK a few years back, some cat owners I spoke to were shocked that so many US cat owners kept their cats indoors. It is apparently very common there to allow your cat outdoor time. (I don’t approve of it, but it’s not my cat, and I’m not the preachy type).

      So, tl;dr – I don’t believe it is illegal to allow your cat to roam freely outdoors. Whether it’s morally right is your own issue to deal with. :)

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:29 am   rating: 28  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.5   Beth1988

      If an animal patrolmen (dog /cat catcher) finds a cat roaming around..stray or not, he will catch it and take it to the pound, or if the cat has tags..will call the owner and the owner will be fined. This happened to my dad, and we live in Florida..so I am not sure if it is like this in all of the US, but I would think it probably would be.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:26 am   rating: 13  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.6   Carey

      It’s called a leash law, and it applies to ALL pets, including cats. Every major city has one.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:46 am   rating: 31  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.7   Ponytail

      It’s not illegal to let your cat out in London, it’s quite common, and it’s actually expected in law – you can insure dogs for any accidents they may cause to others, but cats are protected. A cat owner cannot be sued for the actions of their cat. I found this out when looking into cat insurance – it only insures against vet bills.
      Not only are UK pet owners shocked that US cats don’t generally get let outside, they’re also pretty gobsmacked by declawing and dog crates…

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:47 am   rating: 39  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.8   Clumber

      Ok, i am totally going to regret asking this… declawing is generally IMO barbaric, but what on earth is wrong with crating?

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:00 am   rating: 18  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.9   chesire cat

      Okay so I am never moving to England then. If your cat goes into your neighbor’s yard and scratches the neighbor’s child’s eyes out there is no legal or criminal recourse? Umm that is hella stupid.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:09 pm   rating: 18  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.10   Marnie

      Yah, I’m going to need a bit more information about how crating a dog is somehow bad.

      But honestly, just because something is de rigueur in a region doesn’t make it right. Just as you rightly point out that declawing is questionable (as is cosmetic surgery do change dogs’ ears or tails) there is good reason why allowing your cat to roam free is questionable. The lifespan of cats who live outdoors is estimated (depending on where you look) to be around 4-5 years while indoor cats can live as long as 20 years. For anyone who is a self-proclaimed “cat lover” that many additional likely years of life should be reason alone to reconsider whether you let your cat roam free.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:17 pm   rating: 25  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.11   Annie

      I’m from the UK and, as people have already pointed out, it’s the norm for cats to be allowed out
      I just wondered where you got the 4-5 year life span for cats allowed outdoors? While growing up (in the suburbs of a city) my family had a cat that lived to 17. Just from personal experience I’d say letting a cat go outside has no negative effects on it’s overall health or lifespan

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:26 pm   rating: 31  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.12   pony girl

      I let my cats live inside/outside when I lived in Hawai’i.
      I would do the same in UK.
      Neither has rabies.

      The continental united states has rabies.
      Hawai’i has no coyotes, raccoons, skunks, snakes or other predators either. (other than people, cars, other cats and dogs, that is)
      Here in Texas we have rabies, rattlers, coyotes, raccoons, skunks, all manner of beasts and such to hurt my kitties, so here in Texas, they live inside.

      I can’t speak for the entire planet, not even the entire city of Austin, but in my neighborhood, a cat would rarely live to 17 if left as an outside cat. It’s just too rough here.

      Not judging. Just observing.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:42 pm   rating: 31  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.13   Marnie

      @Annie

      If you search for “cat lifespan indoor vs outdoor” you’ll find a plethora of links including this
      http://cats.about.com/cs/catmanagement101/f/lifespan_cats.htm
      and this
      http://www.cat-world.com.au/indoor-vs-outdoor-cats
      and this
      http://www.darlenearden.com/articleindoor.htm

      There will always be anecdotes (like the one you provided) and those are interesting but anecdotes don’t tell you anything about averages and probability. There are simply more possibilities for outdoor cats to be hurt, wether by other animals, malicious humans or vehicles. They also have great exposure to a wider variety of illnesses and pests as well as a greater likelihood of eating something poisonous. If they are hurt or sick, they may not be able to get to their people for help or may get there too late.

      Honestly, I just don’t understand it. I have dogs. They are never left outside unattended. They are primarily indoor dogs and they sleep in bed with us and curl up on the couch with us. We know exactly what they eat and we know where they are and their general level of health at all times. That’s what having a pet means to me. If I wanted to feed a cute mammal who came and went as it pleased, I would feed the local squirrels. But that wouldn’t make them my pets. I realize this is partially a culture difference but given the greater likelihood for an earlier death, if I had cats, I’d want them to be indoor cats.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:45 pm   rating: 28  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.14   Chinchillazilla

      @ pony girl: “Hawai’i has no coyotes, raccoons, skunks, snakes or other predators either.”

      It also has some spectacular rare birds… probably rarer after people let their cats roam.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:30 pm   rating: 51  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.15   Jessi

      @ponygirl: Excellent points, and ones I was about to make myself.

      I recently moved to Oregon from Texas and am amazed at the number of people who let their cats roam free here. I really upset a co-worker a few months ago because I pointed out that it was her fault her cat got killed by a coyote. Crass and heartless, yes, but it’s still true.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 1:19 am   rating: 33  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.16   pony girl

      @chinchillazilla,

      Most of those rare birds lived far away from where I lived. They don’t mix well with development. We had a few pueo living in my valley, but no way could a cat get one of them, most likely the cat would be killed by it.
      the rare birds in Hawai’i are threatened by invasive bird species (pigeons and those stupid gray doves) rats (rats are HUGE in Hawai’i, mongoose, wild boar(they destroy the forests/trees the birds need) and the threat of snakes (see brown tree snakes in Guam) and development, not so much house cats.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 1:56 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.17   Jen

      It IS illegal to let your cat roam around outside. The same laws that apply to dogs, apply to cats. The cat can be outside if it stays on YOUR property. It cannot roam freely. Your neighbors can trap your cat & take it to the pound. Or if animal control gets a hold of your cat it will be put down OR you will be fined. Domestic cats are not allowed to roam freely. That being said, in many places, they do roam freely & no one enforces the law. I fully recognize that. But it is illegal. I work for the Humane Society & know this for a fact.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 1:16 pm   rating: 16  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.18   Kaisha

      @Jen This isn’t the case in the UK, which is where the note is from. Here, it’s the norm for cats to be able to go where they please for at least a few hours each day. In fact here, you HAVE to let a cat out to be able to adopt one.

      Over here, it’s strange not to see a cat when you go out. In fact, there are 3 that I normally find in my garden. I don’t feed them myself, as I live in a Veggie/Vegan household.

      On the subject of the note, it is quite reasonable to ask people not to feed your cat if it’s on a special diet. Keeping it inside would not be a good idea. It’s better for their emotional well being for them to be allowed outside. Plus, seeing as the cat’s overweight, it’s not a good idea to keep it locked away in the house, as it probably won’t lose that weight that way.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 3:00 pm   rating: 16  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.19   Katie

      Jen, don’t be an idiot. Just because YOU might work for SOME humane society doesn’t mean YOU know ALL the laws of ALL the places in the world. Lots of places have different laws, is it really so inconceivable to understand that some places it is illegal to let cats roam but not in others? COME ON.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 3:17 pm   rating: 31  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.20   Clumber

      Hmm… I think I shall leave this just right over here…. http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_19138303

      I don’t live in Boulder, but my (petless) Dad does, so *jazz hands*

      Oct 28, 2011 at 4:11 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.21   namian

      I’ve had cats that roamed the neighborhood. There was no way to keep them in the house short of never opening the door. Some cats like being inside all the time, but others will do anything to escape. As for shortening their lives, one of my indoor/outdoor cats died just two months shy of 21 years old.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 8:56 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.22   Nocturnesthesia

      My (primarily indoor) cat likes to make a break outside occasionally, but if it’s cold or rainy she will run right back in the house. I left her with my parents in a relatively rural area when I moved into the inner city though, it’s not very safe around here (traffic, broken glass, poison/rat traps, etc.) … I guess it depends on where you live and what your cat is like, plus whether it’s been fixed. They can be happy and healthy either way, this argument is pretty stupid.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 2:07 am   rating: 9  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.23   pony girl

      Leash laws are not universal people, get real.

      The leash law in Austin, Texas only pertains to dogs. Dogs must be restrained on owner’s property or on a leash when off the property, except when in a designated off-leash dog park.
      Cats, however, are allowed to roam.
      I just looked it up on the City of Austin website, the law is very clear.
      Dogs and livestock in the City of Austin and Travis County are required by law to be safely restrained on the owners’ property at all times, except when a dog is in a designated leash-free area. Cats are not required to be confined or leashed, so our officers do not pick up roaming cats.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 2:23 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #1.24   Canthz_B bang

      @Kaisha: “On the subject of the note, it is quite reasonable to ask people not to feed your cat if it’s on a special diet. Keeping it inside would not be a good idea. “
      That makes no sense whatsoever.

      How is it perfectly reasonable to ask people not to feed your cat if it’s on a special diet, but perfectly fine to let the cat outside to eat whatever it may when it’s supposed to be on a special diet?

      Now, I can see you saying that a cat NOT on a special diet should be let free to roam, I wouldn’t agree, but I could understand that position.

      But if a cat is supposed to be on a special diet, shouldn’t the owner be in a position to monitor what the cat eats? can the owner do that while the cat roams freely outdoors?

      You make a fine argument that a cat on a special diet should NOT be let outdoors to roam, not the other way ’round.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 5:21 am   rating: 11  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #2   Julissa

    ha ha ha ha ha!!

    Oct 26, 2011 at 11:30 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

     
  • #3   Erin

    I need to put one of these out for my husband!

    Oct 26, 2011 at 11:30 pm   rating: 111  small thumbs up

    • #3.1   sadi

      Good one!

      Oct 27, 2011 at 10:44 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #4   Heidi

    Everyone else is just helping to keep the bird population alive. The fatter this cat is, the less likely s/he is able to catch birds. Just sayin’…

    Oct 26, 2011 at 11:52 pm   rating: 16  small thumbs up

    • #4.1   Dr. Chalkwitheringlicktacklefeff

      Is there a shortage of birds in your part of the world? There are too many here and they wake me up at the crack of dawn. I’d be happy to arrange to have them redistributed to where you live if that will help you.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 3:48 am   rating: 12  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.2   Brian

      Cat’s are not picky. They not only kill the common house sparrow but endangered and threatened birds also. In NA alone cats kill around 100 million birds yearly.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:51 am   rating: 21  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #5   Somebody Else

    I hope this settles it once and for all -

    You see what happens when you leave the butter out of the icebox?

    Oct 27, 2011 at 12:03 am   rating: 35  small thumbs up

    • #5.1   buttersworth

      This cat wanders in and eats it?

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:38 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
    • #5.2   Dr. Chalkwitheringlicktacklefeff

      Don’t joke about that. That actually happens to me. My cat’s cat-flap is broken so I removed it and haven’t got round to fixing it. So now there’s a big hole in my back door. On more than one occasion I’ve come home to find butter on the floor with cat claw marks in it. I don’t know if it’s my cat or the neighbours’ cats invading the house, but I did find a neighbour’s cat poking it’s head in the other day. My cat didn’t seem concerned about it, and I’m sure he invites them all in for parties while I’m out.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 3:50 am   rating: 38  small thumbs up

       
    • #5.3   rainbow brite's boyfriend

      My cat-flap is broken and there’s a big hole in my back door? Sounds like kitty porn to me.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:35 pm   rating: 28  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #6   juju_skittles

    I kind of wish they had put a black rectangle over his eyes so his friends couldn’t identify him. Do cats even get embarassed? Or would he be all like “Yeah it’s me, what of it?”.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 12:07 am   rating: 40  small thumbs up

    • #6.1   Jimmy James

      I doubt any cat has ever been embarrassed ever- the ones I’ve known seemed to vary between “pleased with themselves” and “slightly less pleased with themselves, but on the whole, still pretty pleased with themselves.”

      Oct 27, 2011 at 8:17 am   rating: 57  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.2   Betty

      My cat has been embarrassed on several occasions. It is my fault, though, because I like to dress her in costumes for Halloween. This year I got her a cow costume. When I dressed her in it, she hid her head in embarrassment and refused to move or look at anyone.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 10:51 am   rating: 16  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.3   *snerk*

      Ever seen a cat fall off of something? Embarrassment. They try to shrug it off and look nonchalant, but you can tell they’re embarrassed.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:40 am   rating: 42  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.4   zomboid

      it’s true…but best of all is catching a cat having a shit – the expression of pure hatred and shame…ahhhh, cats

      Oct 27, 2011 at 12:22 pm   rating: 18  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.5   chesire cat

      Yep haha. My friend’s cat is a beast. He was too big to fit inside the little litter box house all the way so he would have to take a crap with his front half sticking out of the house. He obviously was not happy about this and made the horriblest faces at us.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 6:12 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #6.6   cizzerhand

      My cat is embarrassed of his cat-flap.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 9:15 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #7   Penultimate

    I read the last line as

    Voluntarily,
    Thank You

    Oct 27, 2011 at 12:17 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

     
  • #8   weene

    Cats are outdoor animals – they enjoy freedom and being allowed to roam. It is NOT against the law in the UK to have an ‘outside cat’ – not letting a cat have opportunity for fresh air and exercise could be considered a welfare issue. cats, by nature, will eat when they have opportunity to do so – they are hunters and when there is a big kill they will eat their fill. domestic cats may well still do this . I think the note is fine – many people see a cat yeowling for food and assume it is a hungry stray & feed it not knowing that it has a home and a dinner up the street.
    My cat has a bladder condition that requires a special diet – he is also a greedy beggar – he has a collar with a tag on it saying ‘on special diet – please do not feed’ – his condition is exacerbated by stress so we gave made the decision to let him out as , on balance, this is better for his health & out vet agrees, suggested it actually.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 12:30 am   rating: 37  small thumbs up

    • #8.1   Shannon

      I have two inside cats that aren’t allowed on the porch, much less outside to wander the neighborhood. If you want your cat to get fresh air then open your windows or doors and make sure they have screens. The person that posted this sign is an irresponsible pet owner. If you let your cat out knowing it has a medical condition then YOU are an irresponsible pet owner. It’s not anyone’s fault but yours if your cat is fed by some tender-hearted person that sees a domesticated animal wandering the streets.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:01 am   rating: 68  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.2   jadefirefly

      Domesticated cats are no longer “outdoor animals” any more than your domesticated bird, ferret, or hamster – and I don’t see you allowing them to roam freely.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:30 am   rating: 46  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.3   kermit

      If you want your cat to get fresh air then open your windows or doors and make sure they have screens.

      Shannon, I hope you were being intentionally obtuse because that’s a really stupid thing to say.
      If you want fresh air, do you just open a window or do you go outside for a walk instead? As insane as it may sound to you, people that live in residential / semi-rural areas let their pets outside because animals need to be outside just like you need to get out more. They get exercise and by hunting get to eat real food instead of ash-filled mystery meat that is most cat food. Pet obesity is such an issue precisely because most animals have no place / incentive to exercise.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:56 am   rating: 34  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.4   Dr. Chalkwitheringlicktacklefeff

      Cats need to chew grass for the sake of their digestive health. How many owners of indoor cats provide them with grass? I doubt it’s very many.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 3:52 am   rating: 22  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.5   Shannon

      My cats get exercise by vigorously playing with the dogs. My cats get their greens by eating special cat food for inside cats. My inside cats are very healthy and happy. I’m not letting my cats outside then complaining when someone feeds my cat. If you don’t want people to feed your cat then KEEP YOUR CAT INSIDE THE HOUSE. There are outside cats around here and I leave food out for them when the weather gets too cold for them to easily hunt their own food. Again, if your cat has a medical problem then KEEP YOUR CAT INSIDE THE HOUSE. I am not a cat, I’m a human, so I get to wander outside as I please. Cats are not humans so an open screened window or an open screened door is all they need for fresh air. This women must not be in a rural area or she wouldn’t be putting up crazy signs telling other people not to feed her obese cat that she is refusing to take responsibility of herself.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 5:15 am   rating: 41  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.6   Shannon

      Also, has anybody thought about what diseases their animals can catch from other cats and feral animals? Just because your cat has a rabies shot doesn’t protect the cat from being attacked by a raccoon, coyotes, other cats, etc. Nothing protects card from Feline AIDS or being hit by a car. I live across the street from a wooded area and a very busy street. My boyfriend and I have had to scrape up and bury many an outside cat. I love the outside cats around here, they keep the rodent population down, but we keep OUR cats inside where they belong. There have been neighbors that have trapped and taken outside cats to the pound just because they’re asshats. There hasn’t been a neighbor yet that has broken into our house to take our inside cats to the pound. If you want to let your cat outside then live with the consequences and thank your lucky stars that your biggest problem is that someone is feeding your cat.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 5:28 am   rating: 33  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.7   kermit

      Shannon, no offense but read the ingredients list on your “special indoor cat food”. It does not compare to a live bird or mouse.

      It’s not your job to feed other people’s cats any more than it is to your job to mow someone else’s lawn or water their plants when it looks to you like they need it. There’s nothing irresponsible about asking people not to feed animals. Do you leave food out on your porch for hungry children or passers by? If you’re so concerned about their health, how do you know what you’re feeding them is appropriate anyway? Maybe the strange cats have urinary tract infections and need a special diet. Or maybe they’re allergic. Or maybe a million things that you could not possibly know about the diet requirements of a stranger’s animal.

      In short, like I said I think you need to get out more. It’s not a normal reaction to say that an open window is all the fresh air a cat needs because you’ve decided that the threat of feline aids is worse than obesity. It’s also not a normal reaction to throw a hissy fit over “irresponsible” owners when they make a reasonable request that strangers not feed their pets.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:08 am   rating: 21  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.8   Wrench

      WILD cats are outdoor animals. Domestic cats have been bred to be indoors. If you took, let’s say, a lemur from its natural environment, crossbred it for domesticity, while in the mean time changing its environment to include unnatural predators and diseases (cars, non-native species of predators, rabies, etc), it would be ridiculous to then say “Lemurs are made to be outdoors!” and take your genetically mutated lemur and shove him outside “for his own sake.” His primal brain may be happy, but that doesn’t mean he was MADE for that environment. House cats are called that for a reason. They were bred for houses. Their genetic lineage isn’t as relevant as their genetic history.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:31 am   rating: 27  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.9   Adriana

      @Wrench: Have you ever watched a “house cat” outside? Trust me, they do just fine outdoors. In fact, they seem to thrive. Domesticated cats can go outside and, unless de-clawed, are suited for outdoors, genetically and otherwise. There’s nothing about a cat’s domestication that makes him indoor-only. Rather, it’s a risk assessment an owner makes whenever taking on a cat. All you need to say is that you think keeping a cat indoors is a wiser choice. For what it’s worth, a lot of people would agree with you.

      My cat is an indoor cat for a few reasons. First, I live in a high-rise apartment in Downtown Chicago, so it’s impossible to let him outside. Second, he’s neurotic as all hell and never did well the once or twice I tried to let him outside (when I lived in a rural area). I’m not going to fault others for making a different choice, though. I’ve seen how depressed and lazy cats can get when they don’t go outside at least sometimes. As much as I open windows and try to entertain my cat, the reality is that he gets bored and stir crazy. There’s no solution and I will continue to keep him inside, but I get why people want to let their cats outside.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:31 am   rating: 26  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.10   Rattus

      If house cats are bred for houses , why are so many of them desperate to escape to the great outdoors? One of our earlier cats, who had never gone out other than the trip he made from his birthplace to our house, spent literally every moment that he wasn’t actually eating or using the box sitting in the window and clawing at the screen. When he lost the fur over three quarters of his body, we finally decided that he needed to go out whether we wanted him to or not. And whaddaya know? His fur grew back and he lived to a reasonable and healthy age of 18. And one of the three “house cats” we now live with literally threw himself at the window nightly (cracked it once) until we started letting them out. And they are all extremely healthy and wildly happy and the oldest one is closing in on nineteen and still full of piss and vinegar.

      However, I do recommend not letting them out at night – that’s when they get into the most trouble. Our boys’ flap gets unlocked in the morning at 5:00, they go out for awhile, come back, have breakfast, and then sleep the rest of the day away. They then have dinner at 5:00, go out for awhile, get called in at around 7:30 (yes, they come when we call them), and the flap gets locked for the night. The one who threw himself at the window gets one more kick at the outdoor can at around 9:00, otherwise the nightly freakout happens again, but he’s always back before 10:00 and then we’re all down for the night.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:43 am   rating: 32  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.11   Leonna

      I must be the only cat-owner who’s cat is absolutely terrified of the outside. She won’t go near an open door or window. I think half of it was because she is a rescue and was found on the side of a busy highway as a kitten – her mom wasn’t so lucky and was hit by a car. I think the other half of it is because she is mentally incompetent (how many other cats have run into walls? and chair legs? and panes of glass?). Chalk up one vote for the “yay for indoor kitties!”

      Oct 27, 2011 at 8:35 am   rating: 21  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.12   Canthz_B bang

      “Wild cats”? You mean lions and tigers? Because the ones I think we’re talking about are often feral domesticated cats when we say “outdoor” vs. “indoor” cats. And feeding them isn’t the best idea no matter how cold it gets outside.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 9:39 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.13   Clumber

      shhhh… there there, everyone… relax…

      Culture differences, y’all. Other places think it is insane to keep cats indoors, many in the US think it is irresponsible to let them wander in and out. Meh. Unless you’re going to start doing litterbox duty at our house (PLEASE!?!) you can leave my choices about our cats alone and I’ll leave yours too.

      My “dog in the fight” is 3 cats, all 100% indoor, all 3 rescues, 1 found as a pre-weaned kitten run over by a truck (her name is fittingly, Lorry, and I only wish it had been my idea!), 1 found as a pre-eyes-opened kitten with dead siblings in a bag on the side of a freeway. We do let them outside on nice days under supervision, but we live in a land of ‘yotes, stray dogs, and maybe Smilodons. I have had indoor/outdoor cats before and the vet bills wrung up by them made it obvious that outdoor is a dangerous life, and we don’t do outdoor for the felines anymore. Plus the rescue org we support has in their contract the cats won’t be permitted to be mainly outdoor cats. Our cats are absolutely horribly happy. I swear. Often at them, even.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:17 am   rating: 26  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.14   Clumber

      Also, it totally cracks me up that this is a guaranteed BAZILLION COMMENTS issue.

      Is it ratings week or something? ;-)

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:21 am   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.15   Superabound

      If cats are to be treated as wild animals allowed to roam free, then I should be allowed to shot them when they wander onto my land. Keep your vile beasts inside. I prefer the birds.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:37 am   rating: 12  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.16   chesire cat

      You are allowed in many US states at least. My mom lives in the country and they are legally allowed to shoot feral animals and that can include cats. There is no animal control or law that is going to doubt or question you if you claim the animal is feral. Done and done.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:06 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.17   Clumber

      Just be sure to dispose of the collars though… then again, maybe nailing the collars like trophies on your shed door would help reduce the problem….

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:32 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.18   DawnJ

      Unfortunately, domestic cats don’t eat most of what they kill.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 10:43 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.19   Shannon

      @Kermit: My inside cats are fed food that have greens in the food. I take care of my cats and take responsibility for their health and well being. That’s why they are inside cats and aren’t allowed to roam freely to be attacked by wild animals or other cats protecting their territory. My cats are healthy and disease free, unlike what happens to the majority of outside cats. Like I said before, I live across the street from a wooded area and a busy street. The BEST option for animals around here are to be kept inside or, in the case with our dogs, let out in our fenced backyard. Your “point” about not feeding wandering children is ridiculous because PEOPLE AREN’T CATS AND CATS AREN’T PEOPLE. If I saw some strange kid that seemed to live outside I’d call CPS, so leaving food out for children is a moot point. Furburger and Carl are happy to be inside cats, they don’t try to run outside because they are well fed, loved, pampered, and are best friends with our dogs Millie, Chasey, and Candy Wife. If your cat needs a special diet then TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR CAT AND KEEP IT INSIDE SO YOU CAN FEED IT AS YOU CHOOSE. It’s YOUR fault if your cat eats food left out by tender hearted people that feel bad for your cat.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:46 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #9   Me

    Um, so have any of you “Ooooh naughty, letting your cat outside!” commenters actually realised that if this cat is getting into these people’s houses to eat other cat’s food, then the other cats would probably be able to get outside the same way fat cat was getting in? Or is fat cat some kind of stealth ninja kitty that can break into houses through the ventilation system?

    Oct 27, 2011 at 1:03 am   rating: 20  small thumbs up

    • #9.1   CS

      Some people put cat food in bowls outside for strays. It’s unlikely the cat was sneaking into someone else’s house just to eat their cat’s food without being caught.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:08 am   rating: 22  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.2   Rattus

      We have had a few very clever cats (and one raccoon) who learned to finesse the magnetically locked cat flap and used this skill to partake of our boys’ high end kibble (and the raccoon also partook of some dried cherries, rice cakes and walnuts).

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:45 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.3   pony girl

      I had my lanai out back screened in. Then later, when I had more money, I had a cathouse built next to it.

      The kitties love it (i have 2, and 2 dogs)It is covered and screened, and built so that animals can neither dig their way in or out. It has protected spots from the rain and spots that get rain and sun. I have a few logs in there leaning up for them to climb up and down and hang out on, and a small crabapple tree for them to climb in as well. I have a covered cat box so the place doesn’t get stinky and I have bird feeders and bird baths and ponds in my back yard, so the kitties have lots to look at and stalk. they can go in and out of the cathouse as they please with a door in the wall of the house. it is roomy(24 x 24 feet), so I can go in there as well without feeling cramped and play with them in the soft grass, it is attached to the house on one side, open to the yard on two sides, and the third side is open to the yard for 12 feet and open to the screened lanai the other 12 feet. I can open the screen doors of lanai when I’m home to give them even more room. The doggies go in and out of the house with their own door, and into the garage as well. they like to play with the kitties too, so they will play with them in the house or in the lanai. Even when the lanai doors are open to the cathouse, though, they stay out. I think they know it is the kitties special spot.
      Next summer I am hoping to put a pond in the cathouse for them to enjoy.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:56 pm   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.4   Rina

      “It’s unlikely the cat was sneaking into someone else’s house just to eat their cat’s food without being caught.” Really? That is what every cat I’ve met lives for!

      Just the other day we had to herd a cat out of our cellar – he’d come in to eat the leftovers our fussy cat had left, panicked when he heard one of us, and ran downstairs…

      It’s very common when you live somewhere where all the cats are allowed out. Everyone knows of a (fat) cat who has several households thinking they’re its owner and feeding it.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:04 pm   rating: 11  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.5   infanttyrone

      pg,
      Reading about the winnah and new champeen in the category of Best Medium-sized Cathouse in Texas paved the way for a vision of Dolly and ZZ Top on a soundstage together doing a sizzling version of LaGrange for a 9 Lives or Friskies commercial.

      I outfitted a neighborhood feline named PapelAcera with a rag and a stick of chalk and had him do a little work on that old poolhall blackboard you got at Hawaiian Brian’s garage sale…now I’m second in line to be reincarnated as one of your indoor/outdoor familiars…best deal I could get…Scratchy insisted on the top spot…dat cat knows where it’s at.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 5:45 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.6   pony girl

      I”ll be sure to set up a stereo out there and stock up on friskies for you!

      =)

      Oct 30, 2011 at 12:35 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.7   infanttyrone

      While I still have the opposable thumb thing going, I’ll write myself a reminder to bring my fave tunes across in m(etem)p(sychosis)3 format.

      Friskies ? You coulda had me for generic crunchies from Dollar Tree…
      You realize you gonna get presents…y’all prefer gophers or lizards ?

      Oct 30, 2011 at 3:31 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.8   pony girl

      Squirrels! It’s all about getting these dang squirrels outta here at my house. They keep getting into the attic.
      I don’t know why they keep trying to get into the house.
      I never leave the butter out, unlike some people.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 6:02 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.9   infanttyrone

      My promise of presents was related to a future lifetime when I’m rocking out in your cathouse (new arrivals please see #9.5 above)….

      Best recommendation I have for now is a thing you put in your attic…
      a little miniature house, in the attic of which is another miniature house,
      in the attic of which, etc…so the squirrels go in your house, up into your attic, into the little house, into its attic, and down in size…and into the next house, up into the next attic and down in size and so on until they are too small to pose a problem (I think they eventually emerge in a pumpkin patch somwhere, but we may be getting ahead of ourselves there).

      Find it in fine stores every where…just ask for the Escher Non-Lethal Anti-Rodent Graceful Exit. Not sure why a shrinking gizmo should have ENLARGE as an acronym…must be some Dutch thing. Maybe ask around the other side of the tracks in New Braunfels…but be careful, y’hear ?

      Oct 30, 2011 at 7:14 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.10   pony girl

      Any excuse to go to New Braunfels and I am there. Oma’s Haus, here I come!

      Nov 2, 2011 at 2:03 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #9.11   infanttyrone

      Never been to Uma’s.
      Maybe it wasn’t open yet when I lived in Austin in the previous century.
      Did visit for my Dad’s 90th B’Day party in August though.
      Can strongly recommend 1st China BBQ at 10901 N. Lamar.
      We went to the huge Asian supermarket in the middle of the shopping center there to stock up on dried coconut milk and thought we’d take a chance on a tide-us-over-til-supper snack. Shared a mixed plate of BBQ pork and roast duck. Generous plate + rice for two was less than $10.
      My Italo-Hawaiian pidgin verdict is “Molto Ono”.
      Joe Bob bets you’d love it too.
      (Unless you don’t like BBQ pork or roast duck, in which case from the smells wafting from the kitchen, it’s a safe bet they could still put together some kinda groceries you’d smile during the eating of.)

      Nov 2, 2011 at 6:48 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #10   Leorale

    Yeah, it doesn’t strike me as such a ridiculous request. It’s over-wordy, sure (it’d be more effective to just say “please don’t feed my overweight cat” with a picture). But people are wordy about their cats.

    And 7+lbs in 4mo really is a lot of weight gain for a cat. My stocky, healthy cat weighs ~10lbs. This person is probably just freaking out for their cat.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 1:08 am   rating: 18  small thumbs up

    • #10.1   chesire cat

      Then they can keep him inside then. Problem solved. Or if their cat really needs to be outside for quality of life issues do what my friend’s parents did for their many cats. They built a little house and then put a fence all around it including a fence ceiling over it so the cats can’t get out. The cats can go around the little yard and in and out of the little cat playhouse all they want. Best of both worlds.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:40 am   rating: 20  small thumbs up

       
    • #10.2   Yas

      Exactly, chesire. I want to build one of those for my cats for when I don’t feel like walking them. Cats are pissy about harnesses initially but mine got over it when they got funtimes outside. Not every cat’s cup o tea but it worked for mine, and kept my mind at ease because there are a ton of things that can kill my cats around here and I’m not comfortable letting them out alone.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 8:18 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #11   weene

    pfffft
    The note-writer isn’t blaming others – they are simply asking their neighbours not to feed their cat & the reasons why.
    I am finding some of these comments a bit, well, aggressive!

    Oct 27, 2011 at 1:16 am   rating: 34  small thumbs up

    • #11.1   chesire cat

      If I saw this note, I would start feeding the cat just for the hell of it. For one because I don’t approve of outdoor cats freely roaming and secondly because they are asshats to let their cat roam and then whine about what happens to it.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:41 am   rating: 22  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.2   kermit

      So if people don’t approve the way you keep your lawn, it’s cool for them to come over and landscape it to their tastes because they think it would improve their home value? If no, then how come? After all, they disapprove.

      Honestly, since when is everything about your approval? Do you also pet the working dogs of blind people or quadriplegics even though it clearly states that you should not distract them because they’re working dogs? Get over your control issues, man.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 12:05 pm   rating: 20  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.3   chesire cat

      Control issues? Umm you are the one with control issues. If I set a bowl of cat food out on my back porch that is my right. It is my property. My money. My bowl. By telling me not to put stuff in my bowls I buy with my money onto my porch you are the one with control issues!

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:15 pm   rating: 11  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.4   RP

      That doesn’t follow.

      Not liking something occurring on public common use property is not the same thing as not liking something happening on private company.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:05 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.5   kermit

      So do you also feed the animals at the zoo if they look to scrawny for you?

      It’s also everyone else’s neighborhood, so if you have a trashy looking lawn, it does affect everyone else’s property values. Their properties. Their money.

      Seriously, do you honestly not see how insane that sounds?

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:06 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.6   chesire cat

      Well if the tiger escapes the zoo and comes to my yard to eat the hamburger I left out on my porch, then I guess I would feed him. I can do whatever I want on MY property and no one is going to tell me to stop. I might stop if you ask nicely but I don’t respond to commands. Thus why I don’t live in a HOA.

      If someone wants to come mow my grass because it is too long for them, be my guest. I would send them a thank you note. I don’t think your analogy works. Your lawnmower is not a little critter that wanders freely around the neighborhood on other’s properties like a cat does. If a cat wanders onto other’s property you cannot control what happens on said property. If I leave out some bug spray that might poison a cat or dog that decides it tastes good, that is just too bad. I can use bug spray in my own yard.

      The point is if you are super controlling about what happens with YOUR animal, then keep YOUR animal on YOUR property. I don’t want random neighbors giving my peanut allergic son Reese cups so I actually watch him when he goes outside and I keep him off other’s property. I could not freak out if I didn’t watch him and he wandered over to our neighbor’s house and ate some peanut butter cookies he left out on the porch. That was my bad for not keeping up with my kid. My neighbor had the right to set the cookies on his porch to cool. I can’t control that!

      Oct 27, 2011 at 5:23 pm   rating: 17  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.7   kermit

      Good grief you’re dense. No a lawn mower doesn’t wander. But a human who wanders over onto your property and starts pulling out your plants and redoing your yard is also violating your property rights and your right to keep your lawn as you see fit.

      Besides, if we’re really being honest here people who leave out food for strange cats don’t leave out the expensive and “good” cat food. They save that for their own cats and just buy cheap crap for the other cats so that everyone in the neighborhood will admire their ever-so generous nature.

      Cats are not morons and know not to eat rat poison or bug spray. Rat poison looks good to rats and bug spray looks good to bugs; that’s kinda the point of poison. Cats are attracted to cat food.

      If you don’t want strange cats wandering onto your property, how about not enticing them on your property by leaving a bowl of cat food outside? It’s really not that hard.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:48 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.8   chesire cat

      I don’t leave cat food out. I hate cats. The point is you are telling other people what to do on THEIR property. That is controlling if anything is. That is like telling me I can’t plant roses because you don’t like them. So what?! It is not your property. Don’t plant them in your yard then. If something is yours, keep it in your yard under your control. So are you saying its okay for me to send my kid to your yard to do whatever the hell he wants and then if I don’t like what happens while he was in your yard I can come bitch at you about that? I doubt you would like that. You would tell me to keep my kid off your dang lawn!

      Oct 27, 2011 at 8:38 pm   rating: 7  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.9   kermit

      You have every right to bitch at me about what happens to your kid on my lawn if I intentionally entice your kid to come over on my property with say, candy or video games or a bouncy house or whatever it is that kids like now. That’s the point.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 8:53 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.10   ex-vet staff

      “Cats are not morons and know not to eat rat poison or bug spray. Rat poison looks good to rats and bug spray looks good to bugs; that’s kinda the point of poison.”

      No comment on the indoor/outdoor/feed/don’t feed/whose-yard-is-it-anyway issue, but this is untrue. Pets and children do sometimes consume rat poison with very bad effects. AFAIK there is no way to make it only attractive to rats. Cats may be somewhat less likely to do this given natural finickiness, but it can still happen. Please keep children and pets away from rodenticides.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 10:16 pm   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.11   kermit

      Human children don’t have the innate knowledge of what is good to eat and what they shouldn’t eat. But you don’t have to train a cat or a dog to eat bugs, mice, and other stuff they would normally eat if they were wandering outside. Even if a cat has never been outside and had contacts with other cats, it will innately want to catch mice and bugs and eat them.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 10:26 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.12   chesire cat

      Well I guess I am an awesome parent because I don’t hold other people responsible for what my kids do or my pets if I had pets. It is MY responsibility to make sure they are taken care of in every way. No one else’s.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 6:19 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.13   Rattus

      So you wouldn’t be one of those parents of a kid with allergies that insists that peanut butter not be allowed in the school, then?

      Oct 28, 2011 at 7:53 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.14   chesire cat

      Nope. I am okay with peanuts at school. I am just asking for the kids who eat peanuts to wash their hands after eating (which they should be doing anyway for sanitary purposes), no peanuts in the actual classroom, and for kids with peanuts to not sit right next to my kid, and for my kid to be allowed to carry his epipen and benadryl and for the teacher to keep some safe peanut free snacks in her desk for when cupcakes or stuff like that are brought in. Totally doable and reasonable requests.

      We eat peanut butter in our home. We just wash up afterwards and eat it a few feet away from our son and it has never been a problem. He just doesn’t need it smeared on his skin directly or ingested and he is fine.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 12:26 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.15   kermit

      I am just asking for…no peanuts in the actual classroom

      That sure smells like “no peanut butter be allowed” to me. Funny how when it affects you, it’s perfectly fine for you to impinge on others’ “freedoms” but when it’s someone else making a reasonable request, hell no.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 1:01 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.16   chesire cat

      Reaching much? Since when do kids eat their lunch in the classroom? Most elementary schools have cafeterias for that purpose around here. Way to go to latch onto one thing to try to prove your point. Is there any reason kids need peanuts in the classroom? Probably not.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 3:56 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.17   Me

      Well because this is the comment of the day, I’ll put in my 2 cents. Why would you harm an innocent cat just because of what its owner is doing? Personally, the thing I find most disturbing about the letter is that pet obesity is now a problem in the US too. Yes, they really should keep the cat inside to solve the problem; a lot of people on PA Notes would benefit from common sense. But it’s still ridiculous to say you would feed the cat just because of its owner.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 6:30 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.18   kermit

      CS, is there any reason to leave cat food out? No.

      Look, no offense but you’re sounding more and more like you’re full of it. First you claim that you’re a very responsible cat owner, then you say that you hate cats and don’t actually have any and now you’re making stuff up about children. I don’t know in what magical world you live in, but in the one the rest of us live in children do eat snacks at their desks during breaks/recess especially if it’s too cold to snack outside.

      In short, I’m ending this now because you smell far too much like a troll. The caps lock key doesn’t gain you much credibility either. If you’re going to make shit up to prove a point, at least bother to keep your stories straight.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 8:12 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.19   chesire cat

      What where exactly did I EVER say I owned a cat? Point out exactly where. I hate cats and have cat allergies. If I did have a cat though I would keep it inside. I have had dogs and they were kept on leashes, in fenced in yards or inside. Roaming pets are a bad bad thing. You are the one that is full of it. Point out where I said I had a cat. I talked about friend’s cats, not mine.

      I would not feed a cat. I don’t feed cats. But if I wanted to, I could. It is a free country. I can’t come on your property and feed your cat. But I can certainly feed any cat that is on my property or put food out on my property should I want to. I live in America and here cats are not allowed to roam freely in my county so there is no law that would side with you should you decide to take me on.

      Making stuff up about children? Right….how long have you been coming to this site? I have been on this site for over a year now with this name and talked about my peanut allergic son before so you know if anyone is looking like a troll it is you. My story backs up. Yours does not.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 8:20 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.20   Canthz_B bang

      CC, not to put too fine a point on it, but NO, you cannot do whatever you want on your property. If your lawn is too high and violates a city ordinance, you can be compelled to cut it or pay fines.
      Your rights end at your neighbors’ noses.
      There are noise ordinances which decree at what hour of the night you must be quiet. There are property upkeep ordinances which decree just what and how much junk you may have strewn upon your property.

      No one in a society is an island…not even you. there are rules, and you’ll follow them or pay a fine for not doing so. Just like the Handicapped Parking fines you are so very in favor of.
      Surely you wouldn’t say anyone with a car should park in any available parking space just because it’s available and disregard the law, so you wouldn’t possibly think you can have a rat-attracting jungle of a lawn just because you want to in flagrant disregard of city ordinances.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 5:55 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #12   jobo

    Yes, it is true, us Brits are cruel enough to let our cats wander about outside enjoying the freedom of catching birds, chasing leaves and getting lost occaisionally. That’s what cats are supposed to do. It happens all the time over here, except for the fact the owners would probably actually make the effort to tell their neighbours in person!

    Oct 27, 2011 at 2:15 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

    • #12.1   Canthz_B bang

      According to whom exactly? Certainly not the birds! LOL

      Nov 6, 2011 at 6:00 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #13   gus

    Color picture of cat-check
    Well-written plea-check
    Plastic Sheet Protector-check
    Worst staple job ever-check

    Oct 27, 2011 at 2:41 am   rating: 26  small thumbs up

    • #13.1   Somebody Else

      Nice observation. Could it possibly have been intentional? – to make Fatty-Pie even more 3-dimensional?

      “Now THAT is one fat cat!”

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:33 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #14   Yougottabekidding

    Your pet; your responsibility. This is like chastising someone else when you let your dog roam the streets and it ends up dead. It’s not the fault of the person who ran over your wayward dog, that’s for sure.
    Many cities in America have leash laws for cats, BTW.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 3:09 am   rating: 21  small thumbs up

    • #14.1   Dr. Chalkwitheringlicktacklefeff

      Well, no. It’s more like chastising someone for inviting the dog into their house and then stabbing it to death. The note-writer is just asking people not to feed it; she (I’m 99% sure it’s a she) isn’t asking them to supervise its feeding habits for her. When she asks them to chase it away from their cats’ food presumably that’s because she has discovered that neighbours have been happily tolerating it stealing their cats’ food.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 3:57 am   rating: 17  small thumbs up

       
    • #14.2   Wrench

      Or she’s (I’m assuming it’s a woman — I’m a crazy cat lady, I know how they operate) just a Crazy McCrazypants who doesn’t realize that people who let their cats roam outside often just leave their food out for them and don’t sit inside with binoculars to defend the food bowl all day.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:35 am   rating: 20  small thumbs up

       
    • #14.3   RP

      “When she asks them to chase it away from their cats’ food” – Then she is asking others to supervise her cat’s feeding habits. She wants them to watch the food they leave out to make sure her cat isn’t eating it.

      I don’t think it’s unreasonable to ask people not to feed the cat on purpose but if the writer really thinks the cat is stealing food then the only person that can do something about it is the note writer.

      You can ask the parents of your child’s friends not to give him sweets when he vists but you can’t ask the whole neighborhood to shoo him away from vending machines.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:17 pm   rating: 12  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #15   SimonK

    It’s weird how the culture around this is so different between the US and Britain. In Britain it’s fairly unusual for cats to be kept in all the time. We recently rehomed a couple of cats from Battersea Cats and Dogs home. Their advice – http://www.battersea.org.uk/cats/responsible_ownership/index.html – clearly says that “most cats need access to a garden”, and they were pleased that we have a catflap fitted.

    Our cats are free to go in and out as they please, and the same is true of most other cats in the neighbourhood. When our last cat got cancer and we had to have him put down, one of our first tasks was to visit several of our neighbours and let them know, because he frequently used to visit other people’s houses and gardens and was a popular character all along the road.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 3:54 am   rating: 27  small thumbs up

    • #15.1   kermit

      Simon, it’s not a cultural difference so much as some people being controlling asshats who won’t actually back up their ridiculous statements with reputable links. Any legitimate veterinarian will tell you that cats need to be outside some time (whether supervised or not) and need to eat grass. See for example the Tufts Vet School: http://www.tufts.edu/vet/behavior/feline.shtml#out

      Unlike the UK there are places in the US where you do have feral animals (coyotes, wolves,bears) that are dangerous to “house” cats / dogs. If you’re in the middle of the wilderness in Alaska / Montana / Mexican border where you know there’s bears, wolves, poisonous snakes, etc around of course it’s not okay to let a cat or dog wander around unsupervised. But there’s a difference between acknowledging the fact that a living creature needs stimulation to stay sane and happy and going completely bonkers by not even letting them out on your porch / lanai, etc.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 4:02 pm   rating: 12  small thumbs up

       
    • #15.2   Katter

      We had a dog who regularly ate grass, presumably to calm her stomach…when we took her on walks, leashed. Just because an animal needs outdoor time for stimulation and health doesn’t mean that outdoor time should be a.) all day and b.) unsupervised.

      Nov 2, 2011 at 1:04 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #16   SimonK

    Mind you, the person who posted the original notice could have just dealt with it by putting a collar on the cat. I suspect he was putting on weight because there were at least two families thinking that it was their cat! There’s a children’s book (fairly well known in the UK) called “Six Dinners Sid” about exactly that situation.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 3:59 am   rating: 15  small thumbs up

     
  • #17   Dr. Chalkwitheringlicktacklefeff

    No one cares what the law is in the USA. It’s not relevent here. There’s a local by-law in the town of Châteauneuf-du-Pape in France which forbids the landing of flying saucers; shall we have a discussion about that too? No one else cares what your local laws are, whatever country you live in. Stop saying “X is illegal.” when you mean “X is illegal here, in this small corner of the world that I live in which no one gives a shit about.”

    Oct 27, 2011 at 4:01 am   rating: 45  small thumbs up

    • #17.1   Wrench

      No one cares what the law is in the UK. “Small little corner of the world”? North America is the second-largest continent and the US is the third-largest country. The UK are two islands. Just because David Tennant counts as two men, it doesn’t offset your population all that much.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:42 am   rating: 16  small thumbs up

       
    • #17.2   Andvari

      The UK law is relevant, as this is where the sign is posted.

      And the UK is not two islands. It is considerably more than that, according to Wikipedia 138 of which are inhabitated. ;-)

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:27 am   rating: 22  small thumbs up

       
    • #17.3   Wrench

      So is common sense outlawed in the UK, then? ‘Cause “You can’t control other peoples’ actions and it makes you look insane when you try” seems pretty universal to me.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:54 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #17.4   kermit

      Dr. I think you’ve neglected the fact that no country is as important as America and no people more valuable than Americans. You’re forgetting that some of these people who live in the middle of nowhere that is Kansas seriously think that they’re so important and well known that terrorists are just as likely to get them as they are New Yorkers.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:11 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #17.5   Captain Hampton

      “You can’t make anyone else care about what you think and it makes you look insane when you try” seems pretty universal to me.

      DID YOU SEE WHAT I DID THERE WRENCH

      Oct 27, 2011 at 4:02 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #18   OriZA

    This may be a bit close to home, so excuse me for my bias, but this is entirely justified imo.

    My kitty also has a weight problem. I have a neighbour who refuses to stop feeding him. She puts cat food out 3 times a day, for the birds apparently. We are on good terms normally, and I accept it’s her culture, but i spend alot of money on the diet food from the Vet’s! He’s not hungry, no way anybody could look at him and think he’s hungry. He’s not a stray, he has a luminous collar that says DO NOT FEED ME PLEASE. So yeah, just putting this out there, if a cat doesn’t look mangey and if they have a collar, dont feed it. Please?

    And illegal to let ur cat out? Good luck policing that. As someone said, if its used to going outside, it will find a way of going out.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 4:35 am   rating: 17  small thumbs up

    • #18.1   Wrench

      Then don’t let it get used to going outside, or don’t complain when it wanders around with the wrong crowd. I don’t let my toddler get used to roaming freely around gun and knife shows or playing with medical waste. I wouldn’t encourage a teenager to hang out with drug addicts then scold them for offering him crack. You can’t control other peoples’ actions, and if you have a problem with that all you can do is control the variables in your own life. You’ve chosen not to do that by letting your cat roam freely when you know it has a medical issue. How is that your neighbor’s fault?

      Oct 27, 2011 at 6:39 am   rating: 15  small thumbs up

       
    • #18.2   Worker 11811

      If a cat goes elsewhere in search of food there’s a good chance that it isn’t being fed properly or, in the case of putting a cat on a diet, it isn’t getting the amount of food that it is used to eating.

      I suggest feeding the cat something that it likes better or feeding it more and slowly reducing the amount of food so that it doesn’t search out more food to satisfy its hunger.

      Fail that, keep the damn cat in the house.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 10:41 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #19   Amy

    I live in a city in the western US and we have foxes and even coyotes in our town. If you let your cat our here, in the city, it’s possible you might come home to it strewn all over your lawn, as my neighbor did.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 6:43 am   rating: 9  small thumbs up

    • #19.1   Worker 11811

      There are coyotes here, too, but you don’t have to live out West to have them. I live in Pennsylvania. If you listen, you can often hear them yapping at night.

      At least once or twice per year, I meet neighbors out looking for their cats, putting up signs. In ten years of living in this neighborhood, I don’t remember any of them finding their lost cats.

      I never have the heart to tell them that the coyotes probably got them.

      Do you think it’s better not to tell them and save them the pain of knowing that “Fluffy” came to a gruesome end or do you think it’s better to tell them so that they can have closure?

      I’ve never been able to answer that question, myself.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 10:47 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #19.2   Rattus

      I live in the sixth largest city in North America, a twenty minute bike ride from the downtown core, and we have coyotes here, too. As well as foxes. And raccoons. None of these animals are remotely rare.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:47 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #20   Merve

    There’s a ton of data that show indoor cats live longer, healthier lives than outdoor cats. The decision is still up to the individual pet owner, but it’s dishonest to go around claiming domesticated cats “need” to be outdoors because it’s healthier for them, because it isn’t. Outdoor cats die younger on average because they’re exposed to a wide range of pathogens and hazards that indoor cats are not.

    Personally, I’ve had both. When I was a kid, we had an cat that spent most of his time outdoors. Now, I have indoor cats because I live in a second-floor apartment in a heavily urban area. I would certainly say the outdoor cat lived a more INTERESTING life, but then again, he was dead by the age of seven. My two indoor cats are both 12 and in exceptionally good health. Contrary to what the people selling overpriced wheatgrass at the pet store tell you, cats don’t “need” grass in order to digest their food. I’ve posed this question to more than one vet. Also contrary to what people believe, inactivity and a little extra weight are not as bad for cats as they are for people. The majority of species of the family Felidae, being predator carnivores, spend more of their time asleep and the rest of the time hunting. They’re not out jogging around the savannah just for the exercise. That said, my indoor guys get lots of exercise chasing each other around the apartment and playing with the toys we provide specifically for this purpose.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 6:56 am   rating: 20  small thumbs up

    • #20.1   Adriana

      I think when people say it’s “healthier,” they mean emotionally. You’re right, but ultimately the decision seems to be quality of life versus quantity. If you walked around town in a giant bubble, you’d never get exposed to any pathogens or hazards, either, but you probably wouldn’t be be very happy. Pet owners just have to weigh the risks based on where they live and the general health of their cats, I suppose, and yes, some cats are going to die young as a result.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:38 am   rating: 14  small thumbs up

       
    • #20.2   Adriana

      And just to underscore my point, I had two indoor/outdoor cats in my life: one who lived to 13 and one who almost lived to 16. Neither one died of anything related to being outside. My aunt actually had a cat who lived outside 99% of the time. The cat finally died around 26 years old. This may not be typical, but I can match all your anecdotal evidence with my own, and emphasize strongly that not all pet owners face the exact same set of circumstances that necessitates keeping cats inside all the time.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:41 am   rating: 16  small thumbs up

       
    • #20.3   Clumber

      Can I have the bubble?? Would it stop people from small-talking at me?!

      Why yes, I am in IT. How’d you guess?

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:28 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #20.4   Reepicheep-chan

      I agre with you completely, Adriana. I prefer outdoor with being indoors at night being non-negotiable, BUT every circumstance is different. Every indoor only cat I have known has been overweight and bat-shit nuts. That does not mean an indoor only cat cannot be healthy and happy, but I do not get people who claim indoor only is the only way to go and that letting a cat out is irrespoinsible. I personally feel the added risk of outdoor time is worth it in terms of my cats’ quality of life. I also find the cries that if the cat is gaining weight he should be kept in sort of funny since, as I said, EVERY indoor-only cat I have ever known has been a fatty.

      We have had a bit of an issue with the one cat, a wanderer and a total pig, choosing to eat the cheap lard-soaked food put out for strays up the steet over the pricey food he gets at home. We talked to the person putting the food out and nothing changed, but we let it go. Whatever, his (the cat’s) choice, I guess. He is already putting himself at risk ranging so far away from home and across the street, I have just accepted he will probably get himself killed. He is an adult (10 years), he can make his own choices and face his own results of those choices.

      I do not live in a high risk area though, I would keep him in if we had a lot of wild animals or cars.

      Also the note is funny and sort of silly. Worth a try I suppose, but if you let the cat out you are going to have to deal with not being in total control of it.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:52 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #20.5   Lisa

      As Adriana said, physical health isn’t the only factor, emotional health is also important. Our cat has had a catflap since he was young, and I would always prefer to give a cat the option of going out. Where you live is, of course, a factor; I’d keep a cat indoors and take it out for walks if I lived in a busy urban area or somewhere near a lot of wild animals. However, we live in a fairly quiet suburban street, and most (if not all) of the local cats roam freely (we live in Scotland, and as others have already attested, this is normal in the UK). Despite a few minor injuries from catfights and one case of fleas over the years, he’s not had any real issues arise from being able to wander outdoors. He’s now 16, and still active and healthy.

      In terms of the note, well, the author can hardly prevent people from leaving food out for their own cats, but I don’t think it’s too much to ask that others don’t go out of their way to feed hers. Our next door neighbours, before they moved away, used to give our cat little scraps of chicken and things. That wasn’t a problem, as he’s never had a weight issue, but people may be doing the same for her cat without knowing it is doing him harm.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:19 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #21   steve

    For Pete’s sake; the note is funny because it is from an obnoxious owner who doesn’t take care of his or her cat but expects others to do so.

    If you want a feral cat, let them out. If you want a house pet, keep them in or walk them on a leash.

    Inconsiderate cat owners presume their interests outweigh the lives of the birds and safety of the neighbors.

    It is estimated that between 30% and 65% of all people worldwide are infected with toxoplasmosis. [source - Wiki]

    Yeah we get it. You let your cat run free because you are more important than the rest of us. That does not make it right.

    Responsible cat owners keep their cats indoors.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 7:25 am   rating: 21  small thumbs up

    • #21.1   Amy

      Ha ha…I used to walk my cat on a leash, starting from when he was really small, and it all went really well, cute and lots of “oh, how did you train your cat to do that?” and then one day the street sweeper came by and my cat just about strangled himself trying to get away. No more leash. :-)

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:37 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #21.2   Aleksandra

      Steve, your quote is misleading isn’t it, because you make it sound like all those people caught the disease from a gang of marauding cats. Let’s try another quote from a better source.

      “While the parasite is found throughout the world, more than 60 million people in the United States may be infected with the Toxoplasma parasite. Of those who are infected, very few have symptoms because a healthy person’s immune system usually keeps the parasite from causing illness. ”
      Source: CDC

      Most of these infections came from undercooked meat,untreated water or handling soil without gardening gloves. Or eating soil, if that’s your thing.

      And yes, of course cats do their business in your gardens but so do a lot of animals. Keeping all cats indoors will not solve that problem.

      Either way, I think cats get demonised when it comes to this topic. And I don’t even own any cats.

      I’m British, and from what I can tell on this site, on this topic, my opinion doesn’t matter anyway. I’m wrong whatever I say! I am greatly amused at how angry some people are getting though!

      Oct 27, 2011 at 9:39 am   rating: 16  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #22   Andvari

    It is definitely a culture thing, it is seen as quite cruel to not let your cat outside to most in the UK, unless you live in the middle of a major city, in which case one could say you shouldn’t have a cat at all.

    However, I can appreciate that in other countries where there are more predators, climate differences and other hazardous reasons to not let cats out then an indoor cat is more advisable. I don’t know why people need to be dicks about it.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 7:27 am   rating: 29  small thumbs up

    • #22.1   TorachiKatashi

      They don’t have cars in the UK?

      People “have to be dicks about it” because people are trying to say that the region of the world you live in should determine whether or not you take proper care of your cat

      Do people in the UK let two-year-old children wander around the neighbourhood all on their own, too?

      Oct 27, 2011 at 2:35 pm   rating: 7  small thumbs up

       
    • #22.2   Captain Hampton

      Andvari? Your heaping plate of dick is ready, courtesy of TorachiKatashi.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 4:11 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

       
    • #22.3   kermit

      But are they spotted dicks, Captain? From my limited knowledge of English cuisine, they prefer their dicks spotted.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 4:42 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #22.4   Lisa

      As Andvari said, it’s very much a cultural thing; just because you think that your region’s way of thinking is correct, doesn’t neccessarily mean that it is. Also, cats have a far greater sense of self-preservation and far better motor skills than two year old children, so your comparison doesn’t really work.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 11:34 pm   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #22.5   Louise

      By TorachiKatashi’s logic, I shouldn’t leave my cat alone at home unsupervised, because I wouldn’t do that to a two-year-old. Yeah, right, that’s going to happen. Cats aren’t kids. They’re pretty good at taking care of themselves.

      In New Zealand, it’s normal and expected for cats to be allowed outside, unless you live right by a bird sanctuary or something. My two cats have a cat door. One stays inside most of the time because he’s lazy, the other one likes prowling around our gardens and napping on our deck roof. They both poop outside, but you’re actually less likely to get toxopasmosis or whatever it is if you don’t have to clean a litter box and get near the poop.

      I can see why Americans in coyote/wolf territory keep their cats inside 24/7, but that’s not the only way to be a responsible cat owner. As long as your cat is neutered, you feed it well, you keep it worm and flea treated and you don’t abuse it, you’re a good cat owner. Whether you let it out or in depends on where you live, how busy your street is, and how happy your cat is with having an indoor life.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 8:32 pm   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
    • #22.6   chesire cat

      Does how your neighbors feel about it come into play at all? If you have a neighbor who asks you to keep their cat off their property does that make a difference in if you keep your cat inside or not? It should.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 7:14 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #23   Kelly

    I usually only read the RSS of PAN, but I paid a visit today just to see how far along the Indoor vs. Outdoor argument had gone – actually not as bad as I expected!

    Oct 27, 2011 at 8:13 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

     
  • #24   aloria

    I’m not going to debate whether letting cats roam outdoors is better for them emotionally, but as my last cat came home with half his face ripped from his skull because some wild animal or dog attacked him, I think I’ll keep this one inside, thanks.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 8:14 am   rating: 15  small thumbs up

     
  • #25   RG

    Feral cats need to be removed and put down. Roaming domestic cats need to be remanded to the proper authorities and put down. Indoor domestic cats need to be spayed/neutered and electronically tagged. If they escape they can be returned to their owners and a reward paid to their captor. Cat people need to be evaluated and if found looney put down.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 8:17 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

    • #25.1   Fox

      Can we do the same thing to the human children as well? It might help solve some of this problem with gangs and late-night noise, parties, and drunkards we’ve been having…
      Might want to apply that looney check to psychotic extreme animal haters like yourself, BTW.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 11:05 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #26   Danielle

    I have two cats that have never been outside and they are happy and healthy. We live near many busy roads and in an area where we have a lot of wildlife including coyotes. Having them inside, gives us piece of mind and they live a great life.

    There are many outdoor cats in our neighbourhood and they’re a nuisance. They fight in our yard at night and use my herb garden as a litter box. Recently one even ripped our window screen when it was taunting one of our cats through the window.

    When you let your pets outside you make they everyone’s problem.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 8:47 am   rating: 20  small thumbs up

     
  • #27   HannahB

    We lived in England where it was the norm to let your cats out and when we moved to the US, we lost one to Coyotes. We also lost another to our neighbours who house backed on to ours, who fed one of our cats, at first we shrugged it off because it was outside then they took the cat inside to feed it. We went over there and asked them politely not to. They said okay and they kept doing it and one day didn’t let the cat out! That was obnoxious.

    Anyway I guess the point of the post is in the UK it is great to let you’re cats out. In CA not so much.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 9:56 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

    • #27.1   infanttyrone

      You let a neighbor feed and then keep a cat of yours ?
      And your top comment is “That was obnoxious.” ??

      I get CO’s or refusing to serve in a military for any number of reasons.
      But unless I completely missed what you meant…you just deserted a cat.

      The only thing that makes it less reprehensible is that you seem to have known that it was going to a better home…but still, yikes…

      Nov 2, 2011 at 2:41 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #27.2   Kaisha

      No, there are actually plenty of people who ‘steal’ cats. Basically, they just decide to live with whoever feeds them.

      That’s just how they are.

      Nov 2, 2011 at 7:29 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #27.3   infanttyrone

      Oh, I understand the cat behavior…it’s the neighbors’ not letting it out and HannahB’s c’est la vie attitude that have me puzzled.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 7:50 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #28   KillMeNow

    Oh, my god. I don’t know why I read the comments on this particular post, but I did. And now my brain hurts. British cats vs. American cats. Indoor cats vs. outdoor cats. Emotionally well-rounded cats vs. dysfunctional cats.

    I’m going to go make a donation to Oxfam, in honor of all the suffering humans who get ignored because its more important to debate Miss Kitty Fantastico’s dignity while she decides if she wants to sh*t in the ficus tree down the hall, or on an azalea bush in the great outdoors.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 11:57 am   rating: 26  small thumbs up

    • #28.1   Rattus

      While I’ll happily defend my boys’ rights to the death, I’m thumbin’ ya for the Buffy reference.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 12:15 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #28.2   Somebody Else

      At least we all agree about leaving the butter out …

      Oct 27, 2011 at 1:59 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #29   Parker

    I don’t let my cat outside because I’m afraid she’ll be hit by a car.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 12:54 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

    • #29.1   bookworm

      I don’t let my cat outside because she’s not interested in being outdoors.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:45 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #30   RandyinReno

    In northern Nevada, outside cats (AKA coyote food) are part of the whole circle-of-life thing.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 1:45 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

     
  • #31   TorachiKatashi

    If there’s any justice in the world, someone in this neighbourhood will pick up this cat and find him a home where he’ll actually be cared for (and not fed crappy vet-prescribed foods.)

    There’s no such thing as an “outdoor” cat. There are pet cats, who live in your home, and there are stray cats, which you may choose to allow into your home from time to time, but you have (or should not have) any right to claim ownership of. No in between, so far as I’m concerned.

    Anyone who thinks an “outdoor” cat cannot become an indoor cat, shouldn’t own any animals. “What? You mean I might have to actually put some work into it? Pay attention to my cat, and play with him? Never! I’d rather he play in the traffic!”

    Disgusting.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 2:32 pm   rating: 10  small thumbs up

    • #31.1   Lil

      Wow, you really aren’t good at understanding opinions that differ from yours, are you?

      Why do you think people with outdoor cats never play with their pets? It’s not like the cats are exclusively outdoors. It’s not an either/or situation. As long as your cat isn’t being a dick to other neighbours, there’s no reason why you can’t have it outside, provided you don’t have coyotes.

      It must be weird for you, living entirely in a black and white world. At least no one would get gray hair…

      My neighbor has pet doves. They live outside. Is that okay with you?

      Oct 29, 2011 at 8:39 pm   rating: 11  small thumbs up

       
    • #31.2   Fox

      You’ve never actually owned a cat, have you. They may not be human, but they do react similarly to imprisonment if it’s not their nature–and will fight hard to get out of it, same as a human would. Might want to look into how many of those attempts to force an outdoor or an indoor/outdoor cat to be a purely indoor one ended up as being a runaway cat–especially since said indoor cat didn’t have the survival skills even a part-time outdoor cat would have.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 11:11 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #31.3   The Elf

      Some cats do, Fox. Most cats who have been indoors from kittenhood do not fight hard to escape but will wander outside if the opportunity arises (door left open, for instance). One of my girls was born outside but was captured and socialized at 8 weeks. She is terrified of the outdoors. Absolutely terrified. I tried to take her out on the leash once. I had her all hooked up, I took her outside and set her down about three feet beyond the door. She just about yanked me off me feet running back into the house. I can leave the door open and she will not go out.

      It depends on the cat, Fox. Like so many things about cats!

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:50 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #31.4   Reepicheep-chan

      Man, colon cancer is never going to take you by surprise, is it?

      Nov 1, 2011 at 1:14 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #32   Junebug

    I’d be feeding that cat balls of Crisco every time I saw it.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 4:07 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

     
  • #33   Wendybiird

    My 2 emotionally deviant and dysfuntional neutered and microchipped hairballs will remain indoors only, thankyouverymuch. It’s my preference for them. Now if I could figure out how to keep the 70+ lb dog indoor only I could seriously save on the pet wash.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 5:06 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

     
  • #34   moonkissed

    I have three cats that are indoors only.
    Letting your cats run outdoors freely is just bad pet ownership. Not only is it disruptive to neighbors & bad for bird populations.

    It is horribly dangerous to your cat- that you are supposed to love & care about. Cars are dangerous and many many cats get hit by them every year. People are sick and cruel and could easily kidnap your beloved pet or put out poison for them.

    It could also be attacked by wild animal, other cats & dogs. It doesn’t have to get a disease but could still be seriously hurt.

    All of the above I have seen happen to other people’s cats.

    The lady who put that sign up is a bad pet owner. She should be glad that people are only feeding her cat food and no one is putting down anything mixed into it :( sigh.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 6:35 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

    • #34.1   Rina

      She’s not a bad pet owner. Here, in the UK, most rescue centres won’t actually let you have a cat if you can’t/won’t let it outside. Therefore it’s the owners of indoor cats who are the “bad owners”. Cats who are allowed out don’t live to be only 5 years old on average here. Of course it’s common sense to lock them in at night, and yes some cats will get killed, but the benefits outweigh the risks here (no coyotes, little rabies, etc.), or it wouldn’t recommended practice.

      Oct 27, 2011 at 7:12 pm   rating: 21  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #35   Tara

    Coming from New Zealand, where there’s no real predators for a cat, I find it inconcievable to keep a cat inside – I don’t think I’ve ever met an inside cat, including the 12 breeding Burmese a friend has.

    Oct 27, 2011 at 11:25 pm   rating: 15  small thumbs up

    • #35.1   Superabound

      But you’re releasing a predator (the cat) that is bad for the native bird populations.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 9:32 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.2   meiosis

      Or toughening up their gene-pool.

      Oct 28, 2011 at 3:01 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.3   Canthz_B bang

      I’m no bird-watcher, not particularly big on birds at all really. But, a few months ago while out walking my dog I saw a cat, a cat with a collar, leap up and snatch a bird out of a bush.

      This cat was only doing what comes naturally to it, but I know its owners feed it, so it was not done out of hunger.

      All I could feel was anger at the cat’s owners for letting it outside to kill a really very tiny bird…not a flying rat like a pigeon or anything…just a little bird that wasn’t bothering anyone.

      Now, you can say that the cat was just being a cat, but I can say that, had that “domesticated” cat been inside of someone’s domicile, that bird may still be being a bird.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 1:02 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.4   chesire cat

      Yep that is why cats are assholes. My mother is a bird lover. She spends a lot of her money on bird food, bird houses and bird baths so she can sit out on her porch and admire the birds. Then when a cat comes and kills the birds right in front of her it upsets her. Upsets her so much she goes and gets her shotgun.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 7:20 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.5   The Elf

      Cats aren’t assholes. Cats are cats, and hunting is part of being a cat. Cat *owners* can be assholes.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 10:06 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.6   Rattus

      Yeah, cats sometimes kill birds. You know what else they kill while they’re out there? Rats. And mice. You know what kills more birds than cats do? Buildings. And windows. So in order to keep all the birders happy, it would seem that we need to resign ourselves to an increased number of rodents and a decrease number of residences and offices.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 10:44 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.7   chesire cat

      eh we take care of rats too. We don’t need the cats to do it.

      Nov 2, 2011 at 6:25 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.8   Canthz_B bang

      If cats are so effective at killing rats, and cats were roaming freely in mid-fourteenth century Europe, why was the Black Plague so widespread?

      Actually, cats are not really enthusiastic about killing, or even confronting rats…rats being nearly as large as cats (sometimes larger, your common city sewer rat isn’t the same as a white lab rat y’know). Cats are very fond of killing mice though.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 6:10 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.9   Rattus

      Because the peasants erroneously believed that cats were responsible for the disease (tools of satan and all that superstitious crap) and took to killing the cats. The effect? An increase in the rat population (aka plague carriers).

      And while they may not take on a full grown adult rat unless absolutely necessary, they will kill the young ones at a furious rate. I have, unfortunately, borne witness to this at my last residence. And my oldest, smartest cat did actually take on a rat the size of a squirrel that came into our house and took a run at me when I encountered it in the kitchen.

      And Chesire cat, I am not remotely surprised that someone who can’t spell “Cheshire” correctly hates cats, though am somewhat surprised by the use of the word “cat” in said name. And no, I’m not being hypocritical here – I don’t actually hate rats, though I would prefer that they not live in my house.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 8:14 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.10   infanttyrone

      @35.5 It seems bird fanciers *can* be assholes, too.

      @35.5 Are the birds killed by impact with windows and buildings ?
      Or are these things generally benign until birds make their ways inside ?

      We had a pair of Satan’s spawn that survived on an indoor/outdoor basis in a quasi-rural area outside San Diego for 12+ years. The smaller, female cat found butterflies and hummingbirds the most attractive, but would catch and toy with lizards in a pinch, at least until they ran out of energy or found a safe spot in which to out-wait her. The male was more into catching and playing with gophers, at least until he was bitten on the neck by one, after which gopher prey was brought home strictly very DOA.
      He did once drag back a (DOA) rabbit that was quite a bit larger than him.

      So, to size:
      Standing atop our 4-foot fence, she once arched and hissed until a 60-80 pound boxer walking along the horse trail just beyond it quickly modified his route from being about 10 feet away from the fence to about 50 feet away, after which she seemed to relax, although the dog, based on his increased walking pace and frequent glances over his shoulder, did not.
      She only weighed 7 pounds, but had claws like razors and (c)attitude.

      Her Prince consort’s personal best concerned length, not mass. I found him one afternoon about 10 feet away from a rattlesnake that had found its way onto part of our patio. Short-circuiting his contemplation, which showed no sign of whether he was leaning toward the better part of valor or something more risky, I slowly and quietly scooped him up and, after securing him inside the house and my trusty pellet rifle outside with me and the rattler, put a half dozen shots into the head of what, uncoiled, turned out to have been a 5-foot poison factory.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 1:39 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #35.11   Canthz_B bang

      Rattus, while that is a fact, it in no way substantiates the rat killing prowess of cats. Yes, cats, and even dogs were killed off, but the point is that it probably didn’t make much of a difference as cats don’t really kill a great many adult rats and human sanitation and food storage practices of the time attracted a great many rats. Many more than the cat population would have been able to cope with.

      Nov 7, 2011 at 8:19 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #36   SpudTater

    Americans, seriously; what the fuck is wrong with you?

    Oct 28, 2011 at 7:50 am   rating: 9  small thumbs up

    • #36.1   Canthz_B bang

      Traffic. Roadkill. For some odd reason, we prefer that our pets not have their guts splattered in the streets…go figure.

      If someone resides in a rural area, no one says they should keep their cats indoors at all times. But if someone lives in an urban or suburban area, keeping kitty indoors would be considered the more responsible thing to do.

      Is there something wrong with that?

      Oct 28, 2011 at 8:58 am   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.2   SpudTater

      No. And for the record, I keep an indoor cat myself.

      I just got sick and fed up of all the comments saying “OMG you put your cat at risk — that’s CRUEL”, without any appreciation of the fundamental compromise that is cat ownership.

      Cats are not babies; they are animals. Their natural urge is to roam, to explore, to hunt — to live as they have for thousands of years. And yes, this is dangerous, and yes, it will take some years off their life expectancy, because the outside world is not a safe place. But who decided that a cat’s safety always trumps its happiness?

      Whether you let your cat out or not depends on so many factors — where you live, the temperament of the cat, how it was raised, its age… you can’t make blanket statements here. Learn what’s best for your own cat, and let other people worry about what’s best for theirs.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 7:08 am   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.3   Canthz_B bang

      “But who decided that a cat’s safety always trumps its happiness?”

      I dunno.
      Just seems to me it’s a part of responsible pet ownership to put the pet’s safety above what I choose to believe makes an animal happy. Maybe I feel that way because I think pets are happier alive than dead.

      House cats are often more than happy to roam, explore and even hunt indoors. They may hunt rolled-up socks, but they hunt nonetheless. They roam, explore, prowl in the night, burst into sprints bouncing off your furniture for no known reason, and all the while seem content as all get out.
      I do not currently have any cats though, I’ve come to my senses and am a dog owner these days.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 7:46 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.4   Kaisha

      What would you rather have though, a happy, though possibly slightly shorter life, or an unhappy very long one?

      Oct 31, 2011 at 5:08 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.5   Canthz_B bang

      Kaisha, you’re assuming indoor cats are unhappy cats. Not a safe assumption, so not a valid question.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 9:27 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.6   SpudTater

      Maybe I feel that way because I think pets are happier alive than dead.

      You know you don’t have to be passive-aggressive in your comments, don’t you, Canthz, even if this site is called passive-aggressive notes? I do salute your perfection of this art, though.

      Howver I completely disagree with your point. Your pet will be neither happy nor unhappy when it’s dead — and sooner or later it will die. Your responsibility as its owner is not to prolong its life to the longest possible duration, but make those years that it does enjoy with you as happy as can be reasonably expected.

      Now note I’m not going to judge the way you care for your cat, because I know that all cats are different, and many seem perfectly happy living indoors. Mine does, despite the occasional forlorn glance at the pigeons outside. You know what makes your cat happy, I know what makes my cat happy, and I trust everybody else on this board to know what’s best for their own animals, whatever the judgement is of a bunch of opinionated arseholes on an arbitrary humour site.

      Thank you and goodnight.

      Nov 1, 2011 at 12:05 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.7   Kaisha

      I’m just saying that cats that spend both time indoors and outdoors probably have a more varied and interesting life that cats that spend 100% of their time indoors.

      I don’t know if I’m right or wrong, but I have seen a lot of cats using back gardens as their playgrounds. They can jump and run and spend hours lounging in the sun, a lot more than they could ever do inside. Doesn’t that seem like a happy cat?

      I get that some cats don’t want to be outside, and that’s fair enough. Don’t make it go out. But shouldn’t they get at least the chance to run and jump and play with fewer restrictions on where they can and can’t go?

      Unless it’s illegal in your area… And that is quite odd seeing as most places won’t let you have a cat unless you let it out over here!

      I have to say, though, that not having outdoor cats seems very foreign to people over here across the pond. It’s not uncommon to see lots of them when you’re out and about, and just hanging in your back garden. They don’t cause trouble or anything. They generally keep to themselves and just chill.

      That saying, I’m not saying that all indoor cats are unhappy. It’s just that within my experience, cats that get to spend time with the world as their playground do seem very happy with life. I suppose part of it’s the culture difference. Here, the idea of dogs being crated is barbaric, and cats get free run of the streets (although they mainly stick to gardens)

      I think we’ll all just have to agree and disagree.

      Nov 1, 2011 at 7:31 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.8   chesire cat

      Again it is not just about you and your cat. If your neighbors have a problem with their cat roaming around their yard, that should factor into your decision of letting your cat out if it won’t just stay in your yard.

      Nov 2, 2011 at 6:35 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.9   Rattus

      If my neighbours would keep their kids’ annoying fucking shrieking and basketball thumping noises, and their dogs’ irksome goddamned barking from wafting over into my airspace, perhaps I would give a crap about why my cat is doing in their yard.

      KEEP YOUR GODDAMNED KIDS, DOGS AND BASKETBALLS INSIDE SO I CAN ENJOY MY YARD IN PEACE!!!

      Nov 2, 2011 at 9:10 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.10   Kaisha

      I should just establish here that I do not have a cat. Over here, it’s pretty much a given that unless you have a dog, cats will enjoy your garden. It’s pretty much in the unwritten code of having a house.

      Nov 2, 2011 at 11:42 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.11   Canthz_B bang

      I just really love how some people presume to KNOW what makes a cat happy.
      You know, projecting human emotions onto your cat requires that you assume that cats think like people. A dangerous assumption, but let’s run with it…
      I kinda think cats think like cats. Some are happy with nothing more in life than food, water and a cardboard box. Others need a little more variety. But who are we to say which is “happier”?

      Nov 4, 2011 at 9:42 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.12   The Elf

      I have four cats. They like vastly different things. One thing that one cat seems to enjoy makes another run away. Go figure – they wouldn’t be cats if they were easy to understand!

      Nov 5, 2011 at 3:22 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.13   Canthz_B bang

      My dog likes to be outdoors. He likes to be off-leash too. I take him to the dog park and he gets to run around in a safe environment, then I put him back on his leash and take him home.
      I provide for his “happiness” and his safety in this way.
      I don’t let him out in the morning, head off to work and hope he’ll be alive when I get home in the evening.

      Frankly, if you’re letting your cats out unsupervised to fend for themselves all day or night, really all you’re doing is HOPING they’ll be able to do so.

      Sure, your cat may be happy, but will you be happy when the day comes that Tabby just never comes home again? Will you rationalize that away by convincing yourselves that someone stole your cat? That she was mistaken for a stray and “rescued”? Or will you be able to face the fact that your cat may have been flattened by a Mack truck and it’s all your fault?

      That’s really what it comes down to if you live anywhere near a road upon which cars and trucks travel, so why not face facts?

      Let’s say you are absolutely correct and that domesticated cats like to roam freely. Given that, what makes you think that cat will ever really consider your home his/her home? What makes you so sure that cat will not one day just decide it’s found a home it likes better than yours? In short, what makes you think your cat is indeed yours and not just a transient using you until a better situation presents itself?

      Nov 6, 2011 at 4:46 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #36.14   Canthz_B bang

      And by the way, if cats are so darned good at taking care of themselves outdoors, where do they get the footage they run on those sad commercials by the ASPCA or whatever organization of those retched, sickly, diseased, abused, shaking, dirty cats they want me to send them money for? The ones with missing limbs, ears and eyes? Did those cats take really good care of themselves while being happy outdoors? Was their present condition a price worth paying for happiness? Is it a price you’d choose to pay? I wonder how afraid they were when the horrible things happened to them, and I wonder if they were thinking, “Where’s my person? She’s supposed to protect me!”

      You see, this is how domestication works for both the human and the domesticated pet-type animal…we humans get the benefit of companionship, love, the heightened senses of the animal, and in return we give them food, shelter, security and love.
      We fail in our part of that bargain if we fail to give shelter and security.

      Be a good little symbiot and fulfill your half of the bargain.

      Nov 6, 2011 at 4:59 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #37   charliechaplinpants bang

    Am I the only one who thinks this pet owner’s actual problem is that her vet is a douchecanoe? The cat has gained seven pounds — which for most cats is going to be something like FIFTY PERCENT of starting body weight, if not more — in just four months, and the vet’s conclusion is that it’s mooching too much off the neighbors? Seriously?

    Every cat I’ve ever had has been provided with all the food it wanted to eat — dry food out all the time, and wet food at least once a day, in a quantity that ensured the cat left just a small amount in the dish — and they don’t eat themselves into blobhood. And if for some reason this particular cat lacks the ability to tell when it’s satiated, well, why wasn’t that the case 4 months ago? Sudden and dramatic weight changes indicate a problem, and eating the neighbor’s cat food isn’t it.

    It’s like a person who’s been happily going along at about 150 lbs, and then suddenly balloons up to 225 over 4 months, and having their doctor say, “Well, Fatty McFattypants, maybe you oughta lay off the potato chips!” instead of, say, doing some testing to find out why their metabolism has apparently stopped cold. It’s kind of idiotic.

    Oct 28, 2011 at 8:59 am   rating: 11  small thumbs up

    • #37.1   The Elf

      Agreed – but I do know that one of my cats, if given the opportunity, will eat until she is sick. If given unlimited food, she could easily put on 7 pounds in 4 months. She was a stray cat once and nearly starved when she finally got picked up. I think in her little kitty brain, she thinks that if she doesn’t eat the food now it won’t be there later.

      Perhaps the vet ran a blood panel and found no indication of disease or metabolic problem, and lacking other information and seeing an otherwise healthy cat, decided by process of elimination that overfeeding is the cause.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:38 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #38   britbike

    After having one cat go missing, one get hit by a car, and one come home with a 4 inch wound across her tummy, my husband was finally convinced to keep the herd indoors. However, we rescued a 3 or 4 year old lost cat, and tried our best to have her be indoors-only. After 4 months we started letting her out. She had obviously spent most of her life outdoors and was losing her kitty mind. I expect, sadly, that she will be gone within a few years. None of the outside cats in our neighborhood seem to be around more than 2.
    One thought – if the norm is for cats to roam around loose, maybe the people are more careful not to run them over, etc, out of habit, and that’s why they do better.

    Oct 28, 2011 at 9:01 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

     
  • #39   sob

    I would continually feed the cat until it exploded – that would be cool

    Oct 28, 2011 at 1:26 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

     
  • #40   seamoney

    I would love love love it if my cat would stay inside. She would be safer and not be prone to the ailments that others have pointed out. However, when the weather is nice, she is insufferable. She rips open our screens and lets herself out if we don’t let her. With no A/C, keeping windows closed is not an option. Cats are not obedient and subject to training.

    Oct 28, 2011 at 2:36 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

    • #40.1   chesire cat

      Then make her an outdoor enclosed area she can roam around in.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 7:22 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #41   meiosis

    If we didn’t let our two cats (aged 12 and 9) outside, how would they be able to bring back live mice and dead birds as gifts for us?

    Oct 28, 2011 at 3:01 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

     
  • #42   lyx bang

    In summation:

    American kitties enjoy leading longer, pampered, coyote-free lives. British kitties prefer to roam, and are willing to risk the consequences.

    Concerned PAN-author loves her fat cat, overestimates her neighbors’ concern for said cat…and apparently has very little regard for trees.

    And possibly has never used a stapler before.

    …did I miss anything? ;)

    Oct 28, 2011 at 3:36 pm   rating: 18  small thumbs up

     
  • #43   Jami

    Hey, if you want your cat to be run over or eaten by wild animals, by all means let it wander outside. But if you were a good owner you’d keep them indoors.

    Oct 28, 2011 at 3:40 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

    • #43.1   Rina

      Eaten by what wild animals? The biggest, baddest wild animals here in the UK are probably stags. Or badgers. Badgers spread TB, and it’s dangerous to hit a deer with your car, but I don’t think either is known for carrying off and eating cats.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 8:34 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #44   quiteamused

    Quite amused at the high level of cluelessness in these comments. Thank you for the amusement. My several glasses of chardonnay and I thank you for putting that special edge on the evening.

    I can see that there are no country folks here.

    I have a 100 acre farm. People DROP their cats out here all the time thinking “Fuck, I bought a house I can’t fucking afford and acquired pets at the same time. Now I’ve lost the house so I’ll drop my cat somewhere nice in the country where those quaint farm folk will adopt it.”

    We have hungry tame cats showing up here every winter, abandoned by people. We take them in and they become “our” cats. Some, if they tend to be more feral and less human-friendly, become “barn cats.” They are fed a mixture of store bought cat food and they also hunt shrews, mice, and chipmunks, plus the occasional squirrel, as much as they like.

    Others, if they are very soft, tame, sweet house kitties, become our house cats. “House cats” for someone who lives in the country can be translated as “Cat who mostly lives inside but also spends a fair amount of time outside in the good weather.”

    Other country folks like us, who, believe it or not, don’t live on hardscramble hobo farms but on 4 million dollar gentleman’s farms like we do, are participants in the “Zen” of animals as we are. If an unknown animal shows up, we try to find its owner, and since much of the time we can’t, we adopt the animals. If an animal is sick or ill-tempered, we call the pound to take it away.

    But, mostly, we adopt these animals as our own.

    We don’t call up policemen. Or lawyers. Or politicians. We don’t “THINK OF THE CHILDRENNNNNN!” (the accepted breeder manifesto whenever an animal shows up in proximity to their precious little chyllllldren.) We adopt these unwanted animals.

    Just because YOU are an ignorant fuck who bought a house you couldn’t afford (or, as frequently happens, a breeder who got pregnant and suddenly became filled with a murderous desire to get rid of the cat you’d owned for ten years…..believe me, that’s an even more common tale of woe…..) doesn’t mean your animal isn’t valuable or worth caring for.

    So, households like ours take these animals in.

    FUCK YOU PEOPLE who don’t get the concept of looking out for domesticated, gentle, loving animals whose owners have abandoned them. With just a few minutes of checking you can determine that nobody is claiming them and that they are, indeed, abandoned. And you can kill them, eat them, or care for them.

    It’s up to you.

    Oct 28, 2011 at 7:00 pm   rating: 17  small thumbs up

    • #44.1   Canthz_B bang

      Issues? I don’t think EVERYONE who lost or is about to lose their home is an ignorant fuck who bought too much house as much as some of these folks just lost their jobs and/or fell on hard times (like when my wife died), or maybe got railroaded into mortgages they didn’t understand which were not explained to them properly as the law requires. Many of those “ignorant fucks” were led to believe that real estate values never decline, rather than being told that over time the trend is towards increasing value, but that there is risk involved. Many bought their homes years ago when their jobs seemed secure…but 30 years is a very long time to bank on a job these days (the “job creators” like to take jobs they’ve created here, and move them overseas). They certainly didn’t get their hands on large swaths of land through any Homestead Act, just tried to secure an acre or a half-acre for themselves and their families.

      I also don’t think many of them get big, fat farm subsidy checks funded by the taxpayers. Nor do they get a break on their taxes by claiming their real estate holdings as “farmland” even if they don’t grow or produce a damned thing like “gentleman’s farms” (Old MacDonald had a farm, you have a tax-shelter)…like Christine Todd Whitman did in New Jersey with her estate.

      But then, you live on a 4 million dollar “farm” which produces nothing and are such a caring person that you take in and care for stray animals, so I’m sure next year’s farm subsidy check will be spent on needy people. You know, the dumb fucks who lost their homes? I know this because you tell so well of your compassionate streak.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 12:39 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #44.2   Canthz_B bang

      Boy, get a little wine into some people and the truth spills out.
      Sitting fat, drunk and happy, it’s a 4 million dollar “Gentleman’s Farm”.
      Try to take away or cut their farm subsidies, and they all become “struggling, small family farmers trying to eek out a meager living off the land”.

      Salt of the earth, or salt in the wounds of others? Take your pick, fucking selfish 1%er…time’s almost up. ;-)

      You’re a poster-child for class warfare, and you show pretty well just who’s been waging it all along.

      FUCK YOU PEOPLE who don’t get the concept of looking out for people. Cling to your wealth until the masses come to strip it from you by force, or give a little of it back to the society which helped you acquire it. At least when we come for you your “farm” will see pitchforks for the first time.

      It’s up to you. Alas, those who do not learn from history are condemned to repeat it.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 1:17 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #44.3   tamr

      Wow, you’ve got a lot of nerve ,bud. To spew such a ‘sad story’ turning one issue into a tale ‘all about youuuuuu’. Your kind deserve to be shot with a ball of your own shit. And I do believe the day of reckoning for your type of shit head is coming and I do mean soon. You’d best enjoy your days on the ‘gentleman’s farm’. I am more than sure there is nothing gentle or genuinely manly about you and those like you. Your day will come and the other 99% will clap and cheer when you are torn down to size.

      Oct 29, 2011 at 5:27 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #44.4   chesire cat

      Yep my mom lives in the country and they choose to kill them. I support her decision.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 7:26 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #44.5   bookworm

      A standing round of applause to you, quiteamused, for taking in the unwanted. If only we could all have hearts half as big as yours.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:51 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #44.6   bookworm

      And lol at the morons who found a way to turn your caring about their unwanted animals into an “us” vs “them” situation. Try laying off the alcohol, guys.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:53 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #44.7   Canthz_B bang

      Try paying attention to current events, bookworm.

      “Something’s happening here. What is ain’t exactly clear. Stop! Look! What’s that sound?…”

      Nov 4, 2011 at 9:59 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #45   uncreative

    I grew up in a quiet suburb. Kids could have safely played in the street most of the time, but we didn’t, because we had backyards and lawns. My family had an indoor/outdoor cat. She wasn’t that old when I found her body on my way to my bus stop when I was an Elementary School student. I remember her poor, ripped-open corpse. I don’t know if she was hit by a car or killed by an animal, but she was clearly dead. Since that point, I’ve seen a lot of sad and brutal things happen to cats that were let to go outside. But the indoor cats I’ve seen have generally been happy and well-adjusted. I’ve never seen a cat that was spayed/neutered and raised as an indoor cat who had a problem with being indoors. And most of the indoor cats I’ve seen are not overweight or are only a bit so. Sure, lots of outdoor cats do live good lives, but I’ve never known an indoor cat to be hit by a car. And lots of outdoor cats don’t. A cat doesn’t need to go out to be happy and well, and it’s a lot easier to catch and deal with health issues with an indoor cat. It’s also easier to make sure a cat stays on a diet so it doesn’t become overweight or the weight is corrected when you don’t let your cat out. However, I agree with the other commenter that the problem in the particular case of this note is the vet – a cat is not likely to gain that much weight that fast without some underlying health issue. Unless someone is feeding it something truly weird, but that seems unlikely.

    Oct 29, 2011 at 12:23 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

     
  • #46   Jessi

    I *just* noticed the “voluntarily” bit at the end of the note. Now I’m picturing this cat holding old women at gunpoint and forcing them to feed him.

    Oct 29, 2011 at 1:03 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

    • #46.1   The Elf

      If kitty had opposable thumbs, kitty would.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:27 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #47   Cellist

    I am a cat owner. I have lived in the US (am American) and now I live in London. It is just different here in the UK. Neighborhoods are laid out differently, drivers are more conscious of road obstacles, the houses are quite a bit smaller, and cat flaps usually open out into enclosed gardens behind the houses which means that the cat can wander from garden to garden without ever seeing the front and the road.

    In the US I always had indoor cats. Here the cats are expected to roam, and cats are even a bit of a social tool and bring neighbors together. They are regular features of the neighborhood, and people look out for their neighbors’ cats. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the above note – part of the unwritten social contract that makes letting the cats roam outside possible in the UK is not feeding a cat that you know the owner doesn’t want fed. This person who is feeding her cat is breaking this social code – and this sign is the notewriter’s way of making sure that the errant neighbor is aware of it.

    Oct 29, 2011 at 2:44 am   rating: 19  small thumbs up

     
  • #48   meh

    out all night? growing a gut? droopy eyes? slurs his purrs?

    Sounds like your cat might be an alcoholic.

    Oct 29, 2011 at 9:18 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

     
  • #49   Cooper

    Wow. I didn’t realize letting cats out was that big of a controversy. I have two cats, one indoor, one indoor/outdoor. Both were adopted, and we kept the lifestyle chosen for them by the previous owners (to an extent. The indoor/outdoor was put on a no-junk-food-diet.)

    The indoor cat is allowed outside when she wants, typically only on the porch in five minute spurts, and the outdoor cat typically spends a half hour in our yard, or in the lower part of our neighbor’s yard, which they don’t mind.

    Oct 30, 2011 at 12:34 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

    • #49.1   Canthz_B bang

      Yep. It’s right up there with the pros and cons of gratuities! :-)

      Oct 30, 2011 at 2:21 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #49.2   Kaisha

      Over on this side of the pond, cats spend a lot of time outdoors generally. It’s quite odd to see the ‘The cat can never leave the house! You’re a bad owner if you let it out!’ people on here, and I quite honestly can’t understand it.

      I see lots of lovely little cats out and about, and in my garden. They aren’t doing any harm, they’re just being cats. They mostly keep to themselves, but there is one who always likes to come up and say hi!

      They are actually quite careful crossing the roads, surprisingly, although most cats do prefer just to stay travelling between people’s back gardens. Although, saying that, people are quite concious of what’s in the road when they’re driving over here.

      Although, I do admit there are a few people out there who are mean to those little cats when they haven’t done owt wrong. Once, for example, there was a guy who shouted at this little cat who was still pretty much a kitten and stomped in front of it! It scared the poor thing half to death. We went up to it and saw how it was, and we couldn’t understand how anyone could be so mean to such a lovely little cat.

      I’ve never seen a dead one in my life.

      Oct 30, 2011 at 2:47 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #49.3   The Elf

      You’re lucky, Kaisha. I’ve seen a lot of roadkill cats, and I lost three of my childhood cats that way. Two others were also indoor/outdoor but died of natural causes at normal old-cat age. Still, that’s more than half lost to cars. (BTW, that was my parents’ decision to let them out, not mine, so keep your flames to yourself).

      Whether to keep your cats indoors or outdoors depends on the cat and depends on the area. In my area (DC suburbs) not only do we have leash laws that apply to cats, but if you let your cats out it is only a matter of time before they get hit by cars unless you have a particularly clever cat or a cat with very little wanderlust. In some areas, this is not the case. There may be concerns about wildlife or cruel neighbors – again, this depends on where you live.

      So all but one of our cats are indoor-only, because our area is not safe for outdoor cats. The cat that isn’t totally indoors has been trained to a leash. He loves going outdoors and has accepted that the only way he gets to do it is on a leash. Now he begs for it, like a dog.

      There are other solutions, such as pet door leading to a fenced-in and cat-proofed area. If you have a particularly obedient cat, you can let them out supervised. Depends on the cat, the way your yard is set-up, the traffic, etc.

      Since this cat has an established problem, it would make sense to keep him indoors and on a strict diet, at least in the short term.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:25 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #49.4   Jessi

      @Kaisha, you can’t understand it because y’all have killed off all of your large predators.

      Nov 5, 2011 at 5:16 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #49.5   Kaisha

      Thing is though, even if we wanted to, we couldn’t leave them indoors here – apparently, American houses are a WHOLE lot bigger than ours. It wouldn’t be fair to keep them indoors – especially if they have a lot of energy.

      Nov 5, 2011 at 2:35 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #49.6   Jessi

      I live in a one-bedroom apartment and have two dogs and two cats. All are indoor animals and all are happy and healthy (both mentally and physically) because I exercise them like any decent owner would.

      Nov 5, 2011 at 11:07 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #50   The Elf

    Damn, I missed a cat thread! Oh well, I’ll catch it the next time I see a passive-aggressive everyone-raise-my-cat-for-me note. I’m sure it won’t be long.

    Oct 30, 2011 at 7:16 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

     
  • #51   Lisa H

    Just thought I’d jump in and clarify 1 little thing. This is not from London England. It’s from London, Ontario, Canada. It was posted in my neighbourhood. In Canada it is against most city’s bilaws to allow any kind of pet to roam unleashed but it isn’t really enforced for cats like most places with such laws.

    Oct 30, 2011 at 10:08 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

    • #51.1   Allison

      Are you sure? If you click on the submitter’s twitter link it says he lives in London, England.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 10:58 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #51.2   Simon K

      He also appears to be a she. Interesting, though, that everyone’s assumed otherwise. Here in the UK, “Sam” is much commoner as a woman’s name than a man’s – not always just as a diminutive for Samantha. Is that not the case in the US?

      Oct 31, 2011 at 12:25 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #51.3   Rattus

      In the U.S. the name Sam is most common amongst elderly Jewish men and young boys of all races, creeds and colours. Ditto Max.

      Oct 31, 2011 at 1:11 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #52   Fox

    You know, I keep reading all the ‘reasons’ people keep posting for keeping pets entirely indoors, and proclaiming them as bad owners if they let them outdoors. Yet apply those same standards to children (You have the same disease, injury risk, and other hazards in both cases–including interacting with their own kind, given that children can and will be *nasty* creatures to each other given the chance), and your ‘indoor child’ advocate is a smothering nutcase, or depending on degrees actually considered abusive. Then again, given some of the feral-behaving packs of humans wandering around in the evenings instead of staying at home (and I’m refering to the ones who do have homes here, not the homeless which are a different matter entirely), I could *almost* see the whole ‘gather them up and take them to the pound’ thing applied to them.

    Oct 30, 2011 at 11:27 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

    • #52.1   The Elf

      One day, parents can expect their children to leave the house and become productive tax-paying citizens. To do this, the parents must allow them gradual independence and teach them life skills, which means at some point they’ve got to let them outside without a leash.

      I, as a cat owner, cannot expect that my “children” will one day leave the nest and become productive tax-paying citizens. That’s where the analogy fails. So I’ll continue to keep three out of four cats indoors, and only let the fourth one out on a leash.

      But I do like your idea of rounding up the feral children……

      Oct 31, 2011 at 8:13 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #53   bookworm

    Notewriter: Invest in a collar (can’t tell if the cat already has one from that photograph) and a bell. Problem solved!

    Oct 31, 2011 at 8:42 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

     
  • #54   Jemima

    If my memory serves correct, I had a book as a child about the note writer’s dilema…it was about a scheming, oppurtunistic cat who realized that he could stuff his belly by having a sort of rotation of families who would take turns feeding “their cat” while he pulled the same trick on other unsuspecting animal lovers in order to maximize his daily meal allotment. Tricky bastard.

    Nov 1, 2011 at 12:55 pm   rating: 4  small thumbs up

     
  • #55   Gloria

    Hmmmm…instead of posting a flyer for people to stop feeding him, keep him inside, where it is safe, and he will stay on his special diet. It’s not true that an outside cat will not stay inside. Humans have doors and opposable thumbs to open said doors. I have a former stray in my house, and yes, she would love to go out and roam and make friends, but like I said, I know how to operate the door, she doesn’t.

    Nov 2, 2011 at 11:20 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

    • #55.1   bookworm

      These are probably the same people who give up on chastising their children because “it crushes their spirit.”

      Nov 5, 2011 at 11:01 am   rating: 7  small thumbs up

       
    • #55.2   Jessi

      @bookworm, I’ve actually had a woman tell me that she didn’t want to train her dog because she didn’t “want him to do anything he doesn’t want to do.”

      It’s a dog! It *wants* to listen to you! Seriously, it really really does. In fact, dogs go kind of guano without human instruction!

      Nov 7, 2011 at 3:01 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #56   Maya

    tl;dr ahead.

    I, myself, have two cats with medical problems. One is a tw0-year-old Himalayan with feline cutaneous asthenia (her skin can literally split open and bleed if she even so much as rubs up against a wall wrong), and the other is a nine-year-old, half-blind domestic longhair whose eye was taken out in a catfight before I adopted him. Both have kidney problems. And yet this is not what precludes them from outside time. They just do not LIKE to go outside – I have tried to get them to go out into the run at the side of the yard on occasion when they start clawing my window screens, and both will just stand at the door for a few minutes, sniff disdainfully, and then look up at me with the look that clearly says “Ma, you CRAZY. I ain’t goin’ out there. Fun to look, NOT fun to touch.”

    Plus I live right in the middle of farm country. Fleas, anyone?

    However, on the other side of the story, my family has owned indoor/outdoor cats before – the youngest died at around ten (a jerkface neighbor became convinced, in these exact words, that we clearly wanted someone to kill our cat because we let him out – said cat then swallowed a wad of dental floss left on our driveway by jerkface and had to be put down due to his entire intestine being perforated by the floss) and the oldest was twenty-nine. Yes, you heard me right, twenty-nine. I do firmly believe going outside, rolling on the driveway in the dirt and chomping a cricket or two contributed to her incredible longevity.

    On the other hand, the neighbor who we used to live just across the road from had seven outdoor-only cats – she honestly refused to let them in, even in the wintertime, because “oh, I can’t keep them inside, it’s so CRUEL!” – and as she never kept even the slightest tabs on them, every last one of them was either killed by the jerkface neighbor’s multitude of smog-belching turbo-charged cars he owned for no other reason than illegal street racing, by picking fights with the other neighborhood cats, or by tangling with the local multitude of foxes and raccoons drawn by the cans of cheap-ass cat “food” (a fifty-cent can of slop, no matter how prettily packaged, is probably the feline equivalent of school lunch mystery meat. Yeuch.) However, despite every single cat either ending up as a road smear or a mutilated corpse outside her house, she can’t stand having her cats meet an untimely demise, and if one does, she will then get one to replace it and start the whole asinine cycle over again.

    Therefore, we can now imply:
    1 – Cat indoors = good.
    2 – Cat outdoors + supervision = also good.
    3 – Cat outdoors with no supervision = no bueno.
    4 – My former neighbor is the very model of the crazy cat lady who believes the little beasts are far better off outside than being CRUELLY BROUGHT INTO THE HOUSE HOW COULD YOU THEY WILL LANGUISH AWAY AND THEN YOU’LL WISH YOU’D LET THEM OUTSIDE WON’T YOU? (Yes, she did actually say that once. My jaw still hasn’t come completely off the floor.)

    Ahem.

    Getting back to the point, I see nothing wrong with letting your cat out. Just keep a bloody eye on it, ferchrissakes.

    Nov 2, 2011 at 3:21 pm   rating: 6  small thumbs up

     
  • #57   HatesDumbasses

    Dear Dumbass cat owner:

    Notice people with indoor cats don’t have to post such nonsense since they aren’t morons like you. Your cat will probably be eaten by something larger or run over by a car before they die from obesity.

    Sincerely: not a dumbass

    Nov 4, 2011 at 8:09 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

     
  • #58   Steve

    Wow, I didn’t realize it was other owner’s responsibility to keep track of how many times your cat had eaten? Or to keep your cat our of THEIR yards/food bowls/etc? Honestly, whether you have an indoor, outdoor or mixed housing cat it is ALWAYS YOUR responsibility to look after it. And while there may be tons of anecdotal stories about feral cats and cats allowed outdoors that live long healthy lives, ask ANY vet or shelter worker and they will tell you indoor cats, by a huge margin, live longer healthier lives. no indoor cat is ever eaten, stolen, hit by a car, taken an tortured by neighbors, shot at with guns, bow and arrows, poisoned, trapped and sold for research, tazered, thrown down wells to drown as MANY outdoor cats are simply because some get their rocks off doing inhumane crap or just hate cats. Owners like this really shouldn’t have cats if they are not willing to do what it takes to properly care for them-cats can eat and overeat in any number of ways including food scraps, garbage cans, and shock of shocks-Hunting! this woman needs her head removed from her ass. Stop feeding my cat? Bitch, stop letting him out all over town to overeat in the first place!

    Nov 5, 2011 at 9:04 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

    • #58.1   Kaisha

      This is a note from England – you can’t even get a cat unless you’ll let it outside.

      Nov 5, 2011 at 2:37 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #58.2   Steve

      I CAN read-very clearly this was a posting submitted by someone in the UK. As I said in my first note, whether of not you have an indoor cat or an outdoor cat, your cats care and maintenance is the responsibility of the owner, not the village/town/city residents that live around you. It doesn’t matter if you live in the UK, the US or the moon. I personally would not let my cats out in either country(so its a good thing I’m in the US, where a lot of places won’t let you adopt if you are planning on letting the cat Outdoors because of the HUGE problem with strays and other predators-the exact opposite of the rules in the UK). However, as a good cat owner, if my cat was actually overeating when it was outdoors, and putting on so much weight it was going to die soon -I would think controlling that behavior would be totally curtailed by having your cat only play in an outdoor enclosure so that it could still be ‘outside’ but not able to roam free enough to eat itself to death. And as another poster already pointed out, its VERY hard for a cat to put on that much weight simply through over eating alone. My experience as a lifelong cat owner is that disease and other factors are a better explanation of a massive weight gain. 4 months is a long time to let something like a 50% weight gain go untreated or without a vet visit. Its not impossible for an older cat but VERY unlikely. Simply telling other people around you to ‘stop feeding my cat” is like passing the buck to everyone else. whether you love cats or hate them-that to me is a sign of a lazy owner. I just hope she gets it together before the cat dies of obesity or hit by a car because its now too fat to run.

      Nov 5, 2011 at 4:21 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #59   bookworm

    There are an awful lot of people here who have an unreasonable hatred for cats, and it’s not the people who choose to keep their indoors.

    Nov 5, 2011 at 10:58 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

     
  • #60   stephanie

    this thread was hilarious! that kermit is pretty dumb, why you so bent out of shape, dude? people can do whatever they want on their property, if you don’t like it then keep yourself/animals/kids away.

    Nov 9, 2011 at 4:04 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

     
  • #61   Peggy

    I don’t know how it works in the UK (which is where that cat on the poster lives), but in New Jersey it is up to each town/city/twp. to issue an ordinance against cats being unleashed outside. There are other towns that don’t have any leash law. It’s a “local” law that’s different from state-to-state and town-to-town. Our animal control won’t even TRY to catch a cat that’s loose because they know they’ll never catch them. They’re too fast and unless they’re declawed, they’ll go right up a tree out-of-reach.

    Nov 10, 2011 at 5:00 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

     
  • #62   anna

    yall got way off topic. We were talking about Fatty McFatterson and and his food thievary and/or his ability to score some good tuna. Maybe fatty needs a hobby to avoid mindless eating.. also, a collar with tags would be nice.And maybe some positive feedback from his owners wouldn’t hurt either!

    Nov 15, 2011 at 11:33 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

     

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