The sins of the father

July 3rd, 2014 · 70 comments

Kyle didn’t even want to open the card he got from his grandma for his 20th birthday, because he knew he was in for something more than $5 bill. “The week prior was my family reunion, and my dad decided not to go — and not to inform my grandma ahead of time,” Kyle says. Grandma decided to use Kyle’s birthday card to make her feelings about this clear.

The sins of the father

related: Thanks, Grandma. Really.

FILED UNDER: birthday · Grandma · guilt trip · Minnesota · sad face


70 responses so far ↓

  • #1   Percysowner

    And now we all know why Kyle’s dad doesn’t go to family reunions OR tell his mom ahead of time.

    Jul 3, 2014 at 10:53 pm   rating: 69  small thumbs up

    • #1.1   My name is Princess!

      How else is Kyle’s dad going to be the topic of conversation during the entire reunion. Mom wouldn’t be able to talk about him if he is there. She would have to talk at him. And well, that’s just not as fun.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 9:20 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #2   assiveProgressive

    Somebody is a real loon here.

    Jul 3, 2014 at 11:52 pm   rating: 24  small thumbs up

     
  • #3   Arathael

    What really makes it bizarre is it looks to me like a handmade card using stamps…so she chose the duck, the birthday texts, a giant K sticker and the creepy smiley face….and then still wrote the PA note and sad face….never mind how it’s not appropriate to put that message into a bday card in general…

    Jul 3, 2014 at 11:54 pm   rating: 24  small thumbs up

    • #3.1   e

      The fact that the passive-aggressive sad face is immediately followed by a much larger happy face is definitely sending mixed signals.

      Jul 4, 2014 at 5:56 am   rating: 14  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #4   Jami

    Dear Grandma,

    Duck you.

    Love,
    Kyle

    PS: I’m honestly feeling so attacked right now.

    Jul 4, 2014 at 12:27 am   rating: 39  small thumbs up

    • #4.1   Nee

      That joke will never be funny.

      Jul 6, 2014 at 7:54 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #4.2   Jami

      Maybe not to you. But there are those that do find it funny.

      I mean, I never found Ren & Stimpy, Southpark, or Bevis & Butthead funny, but there are those that do. Live and let live.

      Unless they’re a fan of Andrew Dice Clay. Then kick them in the head.

      Jul 6, 2014 at 2:29 pm   rating: 10  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #5   Poltergeist

    Dear Grandma,

    I was very disappointed that you couldn’t control your passive-aggressive urges when writing my birthday card. Made me very sad. :-(

    <3 Kyle

    P.S. My card has a Canadian goose on the front.
    I win.

    Jul 4, 2014 at 3:48 am   rating: 32  small thumbs up

    • #5.1   The Elf

      Dear Grandma,

      Thank you for your warm birthday wishes and the reminder why we avoid family reunions.

      Love,

      Kyle

      Jul 7, 2014 at 7:27 am   rating: 18  small thumbs up

       
    • #5.2   buni

      The bird on this card is a loon, not a goose. And, unless the goose is a Canadian citizen, it’s called a Canada Goose.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 8:53 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
    • #5.3   assiveProgressive

      Thank you, Buni… Now maybe more people will get my joke at #2

      Jul 7, 2014 at 11:34 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #5.4   Tesselara

      I got it! :) But, then, I live on a lake.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 10:17 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #5.5   The Elf

      Duck, duck, goose. You’re all a bunch of loons.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 11:27 am   rating: 4  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #6   TRT

    I had to use crayons to make your birthday card, as they won’t allow any sharp objects in here.

    Jul 4, 2014 at 4:53 am   rating: 19  small thumbs up

     
  • #7   Liz

    um… to me this doesn’t really qualify as P-A – other than it’s in a birthday card – Grandma is straightup expressing her feelings! Not so crazy IMHO.

    And not showing up to a family reunion without telling your mother? THAT’s passive aggressive.

    Jul 4, 2014 at 7:51 am   rating: 22  small thumbs up

    • #7.1   kermit

      The part that makes it crazy/manipulative is that she’s going through her grandson to get at her own son.

      The grandson didn’t do anything to piss her off. He showed up at the family reunion and celebrated with her. It’s her son who didn’t show up, didn’t let her know that he wasn’t going to show and didn’t apologize for his absence.

      Sorry, but any way you slice this, it’s a low-brow and classless thing to do. It’s really no different than those street hucksters who – knowing they can’t extort money from parents – try to entice children so that the children will convince their own parents to give the huckster money for whatever crap they’re trying to sell.

      In other words, if you have an issue with somebody, deal with that person directly. Don’t go to the other family members to express your grievance.

      Jul 4, 2014 at 8:45 am   rating: 44  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.2   deprogrammed

      It just means the apple didn’t fall far from the tree.

      Jul 4, 2014 at 4:17 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.3   Nic

      I don’t think the grandson did go to the family reunion though.

      The card says “your family couldn’t take a few hours…” which implies everyone in that branch stayed away. His Dad may have made the decision – and yeah, he was the rudest for not letting anybody know ahead of time – but if the whole household followed his lead right down to the not telling anyone they weren’t coming, then Grandma’s got a right to be annoyed at everyone who was in on the situation.

      Because Grandson’s 20 – so what, he couldn’t get there without Dad? Give me a break! He’s old enough to make his own travel arrangements and meet up with people, and equally, he’s old enough to take a deep breath and tell Grandma that he can’t/doesn’t want to come to her party.

      And while one person dropping out of a party without letting the host know is annoying but doesn’t really make a difference in practical terms, multiple people dropping out of a party can be a lot more of an inconvenience by screwing up things like food or cooking arrangements. So yeah, this time I’m Team Grandma.

      Jul 5, 2014 at 8:02 am   rating: 20  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.4   deprogrammed

      Not to mention the sense of entitlement of a 20 year old to anything at all, much less a card. I’m a granny – sometimes it’s just good to hear their voices (or we Skype and text all the time). I know, not everyone has the same good family relationships, but damn, she’s been around for a while; why not just give her a call and find out what the problem is? Or, ask Dad about why they just blew it off without notice?

      Jul 5, 2014 at 1:00 pm   rating: 5  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.5   Jami

      Not going might not have been Kyle’s choice at all. He might be in college or have a job that refused to give him the time off. (My oldest brother and his son both work for Disneyland, for instance, and there are certain times of the year where unless you have super seniority you cannot get off even if you just escaped from a serial killer and need the time off to deal with the aftermath.)

      Jul 5, 2014 at 3:44 pm   rating: 13  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.6   rushgirl2112

      “And while one person dropping out of a party without letting the host know is annoying but doesn’t really make a difference in practical terms, multiple people dropping out of a party can be a lot more of an inconvenience by screwing up things like food or cooking arrangements. ”

      I agree with you there, if Dad had agreed to go at some point. Can we assume that he did, though? Sounds like he wasn’t interested in going, so my guess is that he simply didn’t respond to the invitation or gave some noncommittal answer when asked.

      Lots of people in that generation believe that family reunion = obligation. So I could see Grandma deciding that the default is that everyone must show up who hasn’t called ahead with a good excuse.

      Of course, we don’t know that for sure, so it’s really difficult to say who’s in the wrong without more information.

      I’m less inclined to think that Kyle is at fault here, though. When people say “your family,” it doesn’t always mean “you.” And I don’t blame a 20-year-old for not wanting to go by himself to a family reunion, especially if the extended family was extended enough that he didn’t know them. Just because it’s family does NOT obligate him to go if he didn’t make a prior commitment to.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 3:37 am   rating: 6  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.7   kermit

      I don’t think that family reunion = obligation is a generational thing at all.

      If your family – whom you presumably love – wants you to be someplace to celebrate/mourn whatever, you do have an obligation to go.

      If you have issues with your family and don’t like them, then you should have no problem telling them that you won’t show. If you have no problem rejecting the creepy advances of casual acquaintances and annoying people from work, then rejecting equally unwanted family requests shouldn’t be a big deal.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 6:59 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.8   The Elf

      1) Totally PA for Father to beg off and not tell Grandma.

      2) Grandson could have gone without Father, but that might be more trouble than it’s worth. Either Grandma would be likely to spend the whole time complaining about Father or Father would see it as a betrayal. Or it would just be awkward. I get it. But a little PA not to tell Grandma himself or have it out with Father for not communicating.

      3) Totally PA for Grandma to bring this up in a birthday card, especially when it was Father who decided not to go on behalf of his family.

      Conclusion: This family probably puts the fun in funeral.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 7:43 am   rating: 13  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.9   hbc

      “If your family – whom you presumably love – wants you to be someplace to celebrate/mourn whatever, you do have an obligation to go.”

      Ew, that sounds a lot like the manipulative “If you loved me, you’d….” Some families get together way more often than some members want or need to maintain connections, some members schedule these events without making sure there’s availability, and then there’s the fact that you might not have a lot in common with your second cousins, even if Grammy loves you all.

      The matriarch wanting everyone assembled in the same room is not enough reason for me to drop everything I’ve got going on to hang out with near-strangers who share 1/16 of my DNA.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 7:55 am   rating: 23  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.10   kermit

      Er, what? How is that manipulative? If you love them, attending to their wishes – especially for something like family reunions that are once a year events – shouldn’t be an issue.

      “I love you but I don’t want to have anything to do with or care about what’s important to you.” – that’s mega level of manipulative PA.

      It’s fine to not love or care about your family because you consider them near-strangers. But don’t bastardize the word by claiming that you love them because that’s what you think people expect you to say. You don’t seem to love them or even like them – and that’s fine, if it works for you.

      Or just maybe one of needs to figure out what “presumably” means.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 9:34 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.11   Lil'

      I have never been to a family reunion and probably never will. I’m biracial and my mother’s extended family was severely offended by my mother’s decision to keep me. Her aunts even showed up at the hospital after my birth and threatened to have my blood drawn to see if I was black when she refused to discuss the matter with them. My dad abandoned us the minute he heard my mom was pregnant. Now he says he wants his children and grandchildren around him in his old age. Too bad. I don’t feel guilty about not going to their family functions and I don’t feel bad about declining. I attend my immediate family’s celebrations and send my regards to all else.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 12:04 pm   rating: 23  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.12   pooham

      Lil, my parents are prejudiced too, although they raised us not to be. My Dad says he likes the football teams he does b/c they have more white guys than the others and he likes hockey b/c there are pretty much no blacks.

      It’s funny that my Mom is prejudiced b/c my Dad’s mom used to say racist things about her all the time, like my Dad married a savage. (My Mom is Eskimo.)

      Also my parents and one of my sisters really hate fat people, which makes it awkward when they are expressing that around me as I’m about 100 lbs overweight.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 1:04 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.13   Lil'

      pooham you feel my pain. We should get our families together for the shock value. Interesting thing about my mom’s most racist uncle…he married a Korean woman and has sons with her but he doesn’t consider that marriage or his children biracial because they aren’t black. For about a decade after my grandparents died, the family reunion invitations were only extended to my uncle with a white wife and my aunt with all white children. My gay uncle and my mother and her two other sisters with biracial kids were excluded. At my youngest uncle’s funeral one of my racist great aunts remarked accidentally about the reunion. That led to the awkward “we aren’t invited” conversation and the obligatory address exchange.

      Jul 7, 2014 at 5:51 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.14   The Elf

      One more point in Kyle’s defense for not going himself: at 20, he may be an adult, but it’s unlikely he’s financially independent especially in this economy. So if the reunion was something he could not get to independently, he’d be SOL if his parents didn’t go.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 7:30 am   rating: 7  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.15   hbc

      Kermit, requiring someone to attend to your wishes to prove they love you *is* manipulative BS, and I certainly wouldn’t let love be decided by a single event-non-attendance. Plus, it’s very easily turned around the other way. “If you loved me, you wouldn’t want me to go to an event I won’t enjoy.”

      I’m not sure how you get that deciding not to go is manipulative. It might be dickish to not give notice, it might be yet another case of them showing they don’t give a crap about her feelings, but there’s no indication they’re trying to get anything out of her by not showing up.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 7:38 am   rating: 11  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.16   kermit

      I never said that you should attend to your parents’s wishes to prove you love them. You do it because you know that it means a lot to them, and they mean a lot to you.

      My point was/is that if you love them and understand what’s important to them, doing things to please them isn’t a big deal when the request is relatively minor (going to a damn reunion for a day or weekend).

      People do things they don’t like for people they love all the time. It’s the mature and grown-up thing to do if you’re not an ahole. And if you doubt this, remember that your own parents likely did stuff for you they weren’t crazy about.

      Nobody I know changes diapers because it’s awesome and enjoyable. No parent reads the same annoying book or sings the annoying kid songs over and over because it’s “fun” and a good way to spend money on crap the kid will hate/outgrow in a year or two. They do it because they know that doing all those things is important to the kid. I’m not even a parent and I can figure this out.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 11:42 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.17   hbc

      What I owe the helpless children I decided to bring into the world is a different level entirely than what I owe my parents or grandparents or siblings, even if I love them very much.

      I have nice parents and would probably have suffered through the reunion for them, and it sounds like you’re in the same boat. But nice parents aren’t a given. Neither is the reunion only being yearly, or it being scheduled conveniently, or there not being some other factor like, say, a creepy uncle that you won’t be in the same room with since the “incident”.

      And if Kyle hesitated to open a freaking birthday card, you can bet that grandma pulls the “makes me sad” card pretty frequently.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 1:55 pm   rating: 12  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.18   Kasaba

      I’ve never heard of the word biracial before. Awkward.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 2:35 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.19   kermit

      Hbc, I’m not defending the grandma in this particular case, and I am not going to extrapolate about the nature of those family relationships.

      I just find it utterly bizarre that in some (Western) countries the whims and preferences of children are tantamount and must be catered to lest their precious feelings be hurt by mean messages on birthday cards. And yet when it comes to older/aging adults, not one iota of consideration or understanding is given to their frailty and their (numerous) failings. In Eastern countries, it’s the exact opposite.

      I guess what I’m trying to get at by harping on all this is that I just don’t understand why we can’t treat both children and the aged with the same level of tolerance and understanding of their faults and limitations. (And I say this as a millennial.)

      It’s not different at all just because it’s a “helpless children”. Physically and mentally you’re equally helpless and frustrated if you’re an old person with arthritis and other shitty geriatric diseases that turn you into a mean person.

      Just as old people can be mean and ungrateful aholes, so can children – and it’s because of these mutual failings that I am surprised by the lopsided empathy and leeway.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 3:44 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.20   The Elf

      The lopsided empathy and leeway probably is because Kyle didn’t send his Grandma a birthday card admonishing her for having a family reunion that he didn’t go to.

      Both might be at fault here, it might be totally on Kyle’s Dad and Kyle, it might just be one of those families. But Grandma is tipping her hand here – we know virtually nothing about this situation except that Grandma thought it appropriate to bring up her disappointment in a birthday card.

      Jul 9, 2014 at 7:56 am   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.21   hbc

      Fair point. I wouldn’t attend a family reunion simply because my mother *or* my kid wanted to go (depending on how strong my reasons were for skipping), so I’m treating them with equal (dis)respect.

      However, I’m morally and legally obligated to change my kid’s diaper because I chose to take on that responsibility. I didn’t ask to be born, so I’m less obligated to change my parents’ diapers when their health starts failing. There’s no legal obligation, and any moral obligation ties into how good or not so good they were as parents. A shitty person who happened to make it to senior citizen status doesn’t deserve to be doted on any more than a shitty middle aged person.

      Jul 9, 2014 at 8:49 am   rating: 3  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.22   kermit

      Actually, in Israel (and likely in other countries too) you are indeed legally responsible for the welfare of your elderly parents, unless it’s evident that you were abused and neglected by them. And technically even in the US you can have charges brought against you for inadequately taking care of your elderly parents (see Casey Kasem, Mickey Rooney, etc.)

      And sorry, but in the vast majority of cases (where no abuse or neglect occurs) the moral obligation goes both ways.

      Elf, I wasn’t talking about the lopsided empathy in the Kyle note. I’m purely speaking in general terms in response to the attitude of “I didn’t ask to be born, so I shouldn’t have to deal with it”.

      Jul 9, 2014 at 9:18 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.23   assiveProgressive

      In China, it’s the LAW that you have to visit your elderly parents.

      Jul 9, 2014 at 10:51 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #7.24   Raichu

      It’s PA because it’s on a birthday card and because it’s not directed at the person with whom she actually has an issue. Her concerns are valid; her method of delivery was inappropriate.

      Aug 10, 2014 at 12:44 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #8   katy

    Someday you will get old, love your family and wish they would see you. I agree doing it all with one postage stamp is odd but maybe not well set with income later in life. Most of you are being heartless to some older 60 something woman who just might love her family who is too busy for her anymore. I hope she gets some real friends as family has no time for her obviously.

    Jul 4, 2014 at 10:41 am   rating: 8  small thumbs up

    • #8.1   Debbie

      Kyle’s 20, too. He could go on his own, regardless of what his father does.

      Jul 4, 2014 at 11:56 am   rating: 9  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.2   kermit

      Er, people are being “heartless” to the grandma because she’s taking out her anger on her grandson when he did nothing wrong. Gradma herself doesn’t even have an issue with Kyle – as the note clearly indicates. She has an issue with another person.

      Jul 4, 2014 at 1:39 pm   rating: 18  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.3   Phoenix

      Sorry, but I expect good manners at any age. A birthday card is one time that is officially set aside to CARE about another person. She made it about herself. Bad manners.

      Showing that you are unpleasant and selfish isn’t a good way to get family to spend time with you. If you’re interested in them and show that you care, people might WANT to spend time with you!

      Jul 4, 2014 at 1:55 pm   rating: 45  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.4   Jami

      Just because a person is old doesn’t mean they deserve kindness nor respect. I’ve got patrons who come to the library who I would be surprised if their kids (if they have any) would even put them in a cut rate nursing home should they become unable to care for themselves. They’re just that nasty and vile.

      Jul 4, 2014 at 5:54 pm   rating: 26  small thumbs up

       
    • #8.5   The Elf

      Friends are the family you choose for yourself. And I’ll take them any day over some of my blood relatives. I’ve got a few that go to Jami’s library…….

      Jul 7, 2014 at 7:46 am   rating: 9  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #9   a*p

    I got the impression that because Kyle’s Dad didn’t go to the reunion, no one from that branch did. So in that case, yes, she is talking to Kyle, and he is 20 so adult enough to bear the burden.

    If Grandma had slipped that note into 6yo Kyle’s birthday card, then yes he’d be an innocent caught in the crossfire.

    Jul 4, 2014 at 7:23 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

     
  • #10   Kacky

    This is about as un-passive/aggressive as you can get. Whether or not she had a right to call him on it, she is honest and direct.

    Jul 4, 2014 at 7:28 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

    • #10.1   Poltergeist

      It’s passive-aggressive because she wrote it in his BIRTHDAY CARD of all places.

      Jul 4, 2014 at 7:55 pm   rating: 24  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #11   Lita bang

    So basically… “Well, I hope you had (or have) a happy birthday, but I’m SO SAD.”

    You laugh lest you cry…

    Jul 4, 2014 at 10:41 pm   rating: 11  small thumbs up

    • #11.1   Emma

      Exactly! It’s not about the fact that she expressed her feelings, it’s about the fact that she did it in his birthday card that’s passive aggressive and inappropriate. Also, I’m not so quick to pass judgement on Kyle’s dad and his immediate family for not attending the reunion. For all we know there could be a legitimate reason for not going. Not everyone has a great family. Yes, not saying anything ahead of time is passive aggressive, but maybe he was trying to avoid drama. The kind of person who thinks it’s appropriate to air her feelings of disappointment in a birthday card seems like the kind of person who tends to engage in drama, or maybe Kyle’s dad was being insensitive.

      Jul 5, 2014 at 8:21 pm   rating: 11  small thumbs up

       
    • #11.2   Lita bang

      Either way, I think we can probably agree that some portion of this family puts the fun in dysfunctional!

      Jul 5, 2014 at 11:08 pm   rating: 8  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #12   assiveProgressive

    So, did anybody go to a family reunion over the long holiday weekend … Just joking. I only had one day off on the Fourth of July weekend and you couldn’t have paid me to spend it with relatives

    Jul 7, 2014 at 11:40 am   rating: 5  small thumbs up

     
  • #13   Old Fart

    Just because a person is old doesn’t mean they deserve kindness nor respect. <—–THIS IS EXACTLY WHY us "old people" HATE the younger generation – you are disrespectful, can't dress, no manners, can't spell worth a damn. We have lived generations and decades before. The past was a totally different planet….now all you yahoos want it given to you and served on a silver platter. Ef off little punk. You and your ilk have ruined it for the rest of us.

    Grandma XoxO

    Jul 7, 2014 at 12:30 pm   rating: 3  small thumbs up

    • #13.1   The Elf

      And stay off my lawn!

      Jul 8, 2014 at 7:30 am   rating: 12  small thumbs up

       
    • #13.2   Snicklefritz

      Dagnabbit!

      @Old Fart – who peed in your cornflakes this morning?

      That being said, gonna have to agree about this new generation coming up. They seem to be the most clueless, self absorbed generation I’ve seen in a long time. I blame facebook and reality tv….. and solar flares.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 10:51 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #13.3   Tesselara

      Jul 8, 2014 at 11:56 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
    • #13.4   hbc

      Cranky Grandma, good thing you didn’t get on us for our punctuation. I think you meant “Eff off, little punk.” The second “f” is debatable, but the comma is necessary. Also, your ellipsis should only have three dots since it’s not at the end of a sentence.

      I write this with all due respect, of course.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 2:01 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

       
    • #13.5   Poltergeist

      My grandmother was an example of an elderly person who deserved the love and respect that she got. She was wonderful and I wish she was still around.

      You, however, sound like a miserable, nasty person. It’s disrespectful of you to think that you should automatically be put on the same pedestal as my grandmother just because you are old.

      Jul 8, 2014 at 9:10 pm   rating: 9  small thumbs up

       
    • #13.6   Raichu

      Well, Old Fart, there are lots of old people I like and respect. You are not one of them. Acting like that doesn’t make us “young whippersnappers” want to spend any time with you; we have lives of our own, and they don’t revolve around you just because you’re older.

      Aug 10, 2014 at 12:53 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #14   Tesselara

    ::ducks the hard green apples thrown from the rocking chair::

    Jul 8, 2014 at 12:12 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

    • #14.1   Lita bang

      *waves cane around, spits dentures out in furious spout of angry yelling*

      Jul 8, 2014 at 5:13 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #14.2   pooham

      HAHAHAHA! I love this thread!

      Jul 8, 2014 at 7:09 pm   rating: 1  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #15   kaetra

    Obligatory event? No thanks. Fun event? Count me in! My side’s reunion is a bunch of people sitting around complaining about each other. My husband’s side is a huge party with super fun games, awesome food and great people cheering each other on and truly enjoying each others company. Guess which one we go to every year and which one we skip?

    Jul 8, 2014 at 1:56 pm   rating: 11  small thumbs up

     
  • #16   Old Fart

    @ The Elf – left you a little something on your lawn….lmao.
    @hbc – little grammar nazi aren’t ya? You should double space between sentences little twerp. Comma WASN’T neccessary – I didn’t pause in my bated response.
    What do they teach you kids nowadays in school? Please go back to watching Sesame Street or Barney. Twit face. :-)
    @ Poltergeist – I NEVER said anything about being on a pedestal with YOUR family coons. But now that I think about it……………………………………….
    And how do you know I’m old? You must believe everything you read on the internet.
    Sheep.

    Jul 9, 2014 at 9:31 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

    • #16.1   Poltergeist

      You’re a loser and a troll. Have fun living a lonely life.

      Jul 9, 2014 at 6:04 pm   rating: 2  small thumbs up

       
    • #16.2   Raichu

      You do realize you can reply directly to comments and threads, right, Old Fart?

      Aug 10, 2014 at 12:59 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up

       
     
  • #17   Old Fart

    I can’t wait for all you to get to be 60 or 70 years of age….if selected stupidity doesn’t get to ya first.
    You are all going to be bitchin’ about the same crap – I feel for ya’ll……………really……I do (smirk)
    Good luck with the future. And remember – treat your parents well. We chose not to swallow you. LMAO

    Jul 9, 2014 at 9:34 am   rating: 2  small thumbs up

     
  • #18   mercy

    Reading all these comments makes me sad about the family situation most of you have :( In my immediate family of four, we live in 3 different countries. Don’t even get me started on cousins and such. I wish we saw each other more often. It literally breaks my heart to not have my family around. I’m sorry for you all who have had terrible family traditions, upbringings etc. Makes me love my crazy, dysfunctional, loving family all that much more. Running away to call them now….

    Jul 17, 2014 at 9:02 am   rating: 1  small thumbs up

     
  • #19   nusratasha

    Tired of telling your kids to stop playing games on their mobile and do something useful?
    Screentime Ninja automagically blocks the device after a pre-set amount of time, but lets the kid earn more play time by solving math problems which are tailored to his/her school curriculum.
    If the child cannot solve a problem, Screentime Ninja will show how to solve it.
    Each kid has an individual profile configured by the parent. As a parent you define how much play time each kid earns by solving a problem, how much play time needs to be earned before it can be redeemed, when and for how long each kid can play on a given day.
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=screentime.ninja&referrer=utm_source%3DNusrat

    Jul 19, 2014 at 1:26 pm   rating: 0  small thumbs up